Managing accounts receivable and owed for suppliers and customers Planning of

Managing accounts receivable and owed for suppliers

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Managing accounts receivable and owed for suppliers and customers Planning of delivery routes and division of deliveries in an efficient manner Managing customer complaints, questions, modifications 3. Identify and write down which job(s) is responsible for performing each task. Food handler/chef: Receiving, stocking, preparing food, cooking and packaging meals. Developing a meal plan and list of required ingredients Deliverer: Delivering meals Administration: Ordering food/supplies, maintaining customer information and orders, managing accounts, plan delivery routes, managing customer complaints, questions, modifications. 4. Identify and write down the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to perform each job. Food handler/chef: Knowledge of food safety practices. Cooking skills. Ability to lift heavy boxes of food, fine motor skill in food prep, ability to multi-task. Knowledge of safe cleaning and disinfecting practices. Deliverer: Driver’s license, “people skills”, time management skills, ability to lift light items, walk/navigate in outdoor and unusual indoor conditions, ability to work independently. Knowledge of the city is preferred. Administration: Computer skills, people management skills, “people skills”, HRM skills, multitasking 5. Identify how many staff you will need in each job and the reporting structure of the organization. Chef:3?
Deliverers: 3? Administration: 2? 6. Describe the physical setting in which this work flow will take place. At a high level, what will the workplace look like and what kinds of equipment and furnishings will be required? Physical setting will require a kitchen area with capability to receive large shipments of food and store that food. Also to clean dishes and store them. Deliverers will require no physical space as they would use their own vehicles with coolers Administration will require office space, but does not necessarily need to be in the same location as the kitchen. At a higher level, a larger location with kitchen and office space combined would be used. A fleet of vehicles capable of carrying more meals would be purchased. A break room for employees would be needed. Industrial cooking and cleaning equipment. Learning activity 3.4 See notebook Learning activity 3.5 1. What are two job-design concerns that are identified in the song? Ergonomic design in the form of office space design and usage of small cubicles. Behavioural concerns are evident in the lyric “my job is stupid, my day’s a bore” and indicate a lack of job enrichment. The employee does not enjoy their work, not find it meaningful or satisfying. 2. Why do you think each concern has arisen? Small, identical office spaces could contribute to a feeling of unimportance, as an employee’s workspace may be a reflection of the work they do. A lack of visual and environmental diversity may increase a feeling of boredom and repetitiveness.

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