Comfort in the holistic sense is conceptualized as

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Comfort (in the holistic sense) is conceptualized as the instant know-how of having met the basicneeds of the patient in (three forms) sense of relief, ease, and transcendence (Kolcaba, 1992).Purpose.The purpose of the comfort theory is to empathize the importance of the comfort in our patients within our nursing practice; focusing on three types of comfort: patient’s relief, ease, and transcendence (Kolcaba, 2003). One of the most important messages of the comfort theory is that comfort needs occur in both physical and mental needs (Kolcaba, 2001). There are many ways to comfort the patient within Katharine Kolcaba’s theory and they’re broken into contexts concerning the spiritual, emotional, and physical aspects of patient care (Kolcaba, 2003). Kolcaba further expands on the types of comfort: health care needs,
COMFORT THEORY CRITIQUE4nursing interventions, intervening variables, enhanced comfort, health-seeking behaviors, and institutional integrity (Kolcaba, 2003). Comfort measures are essentially the interventions done to support the patients’ needs for well-being (Kolcaba, 2001).Definition.There are many portions of this theory to define, first would be the three forms of comfort: relief, ease, and transcendence. Relief is defined as the situation of a patient who has obtained specific comfort to their needs (Kolcaba, 2003). Ease is defined as a state of calmness or having contentment obtained (Kolcaba, 2003). Transcendence is defined as the state in which a patient would rise above their problem or needs (Kolcaba, 2003). The four contexts ofthe theory are defined as well. Physical comfort is defined by Kolcaba (2003) as all of the physiological ramifications of diseases processes, such as fluid/electrolyte balances, stable blood chemistry, acceptable oxygenation, and other metabolic balances in the body (Kolcaba, 2003). An additional definition of physical comfort was that of a position of self (Kolcaba, 2003). Psychospiritual Comfort is defined as a combined definition of mental, emotional and spiritual awareness of self (Kolcaba, 2003). The evolvement of the psychospiritual definition has come to be whatever gives someone’s life it’s meaning and encompasses self-esteem, self-concept, sexuality, and one’s relationship with a higher power (Kolcaba, 2003). Environmental Comfort definition has also evolved into a definition that is “pertaining to external surroundings, conditions, and influences” (Kolcaba, 2003, p. 429). Also lumped into this definition is the environment of the surroundings of the patient, including but not limited to, temperature, surroundings, views, and natural versus synthetic things (Kolcaba, 2003). Sociocultural Comfort is defined and evolved to be “interpersonal, family, and societal relationships including finances, education, and support” (Kolcaba, 2003, p. 444). Further definitions come from the conceptual framework of the theory: healthcare needs, nursing interventions, intervening variables,
COMFORT THEORY CRITIQUE5enhanced comfort, health-seeking behaviors (internal and external), and institutional integrity (best practice and policy) (Petiprin, 2016).

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