This is another perfect example of our checks and balance system at work

This is another perfect example of our checks and

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system at work. Without all three branches nothing can get done, however, without all three branches we would also have laws that would impede on the rights and freedoms of the American people. Another important thing about all three branches working together is that if theneed arises, and all three branches collaborate, the President can be impeached with reasonable evidence of misconduct, though this is rare. 3. I personally think that all three governmental branches interact with one another in mostly a positive way. Though there are times when you can see some childish moves, one branch prevents another from doing something just because they want something, they use their power as leverage at times. Though I guess this is to be expected as there is corruption no matter where you go or what you are talking about. Evil exists everywhere. But for the most part I feel that the three branches work as they were intended to. I believe it is a good thing that our branches are setup the way they are because it keeps every branch in check with their power. I cannot image what the United States would be like if one branch had more power than the other. You would have crazy laws that would violate the rights and freedoms of the American people. We see laws that are tying to be put into place that are unconstitutional all the time, however, they are shot down by the Supreme Court, this is our checks and balances, this is why we have the three branches set up the way we do.
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ReferencesChecks and Balances: The Three Branches of the American Government. (2005). Key positions in the Judicial branch. Retrieved from -political-magazines/key-positions-judicial-branchConstitutional Topic: Separation of Powers - The U.S. Constitution Online. (n.d.). Retrieved December 2, 2018, from Dictionary of American History: Separation of Powers. (2003). Retrieved December 2, 2018 from -releases/separation-powersLegislative branch. (2014). Salem Press Encyclopedia. Retrieved from ?direct=true&db=ers&AN=98402130&site=eds-live&scope=siteS. 1998 (109th): Stolen Valor Act of 2005. (n.d.). Retrieved December 2, 2018, from
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  • Fall '13
  • Government, Separation of Powers, President of the United States, United States Congress

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