The conversations between the client and counselor aided in solving the problem

The conversations between the client and counselor

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as each client has his own individual needs. The conversations between the client and counselor aided in solving the problem (Corey, 2013). When an alliance has been established the client can feel he has power. Basic trust in the client’s knowledge of self, that he has an understanding of what is wrong and can make his own goals, was the foundation of nondirective therapy; therefore, the therapist has no need to direct the client (Kirschenbaum, 2012). Core conditions. Empathy, congruence, and unconditional positive regard, three of the six conditions described, have been called the core conditions (Elliott & Freire, 2007). Research on conditions, process, outcomes, and motivations has been done suggesting that a therapist must possess these conditions in order to engage in a successful process (Cornelius- White, 2008). During Rogers’ time working as an academic in Wisconsin, he researched psychotherapy among schizophrenics. The goal had been to discover the trends between the facilitating conditions of change and the client process (Quinn, 2015). The team measured the therapist’s empathy, congruence, and unconditional positive regard from the point of view of the therapist, outside observers, and the client. Research determined that the therapeutic relationship was the most important aspect for predicting successful outcomes due to the amount of counselors with the best results who were the most empathic and congruent (Kirschenbaum, 2012). Therapists working successfully have been thought to possess all three core conditions (Cornelius- White, 2008). Elliott and Freire (2007) argued, “If the therapist, instead of attempting to change the client, strives to accept the client unconditionally, change will follow naturally” (p. 286). During the therapeutic process counselors who practiced genuinely with unconditional positive regard and empathic understanding aided the client in feeling accepted
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PERSON-CENTERED AND CLASSICAL ROGERIAN 8 (Elliott & Freire, 2007). If a person who has felt fully accepted cannot help changing. The counselor was a genuine alter ego to the client in distress and becomes a nurturing companion/ active listener (Anderson, 2001). Developments of the Person-Centered Approach Rogers resisted organizations and defining person-centered. Rogers insisted that defining “client- centered/ person-centered” would cause stagnation of the approach, which led to establishing an orthodoxy almost impossible and aided in keeping the approach developing. He wanted the person-centered approach to continue developing. Rogers’ stated, “I hope we’re always on the move to a new theory, new ways of being, to new areas of dealing with situations, new ways of being with persons” (as cited in Kirschenbaum, 2012, p. 18).
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