Did she approve of the vacation plan the casserole

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Essentials of Business Communication
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Chapter 14 / Exercise 14.8
Essentials of Business Communication
Guffey/Loewy
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Did she approve of the vacation plan? The casserole consists of squirrel and noodles. The red shirt contrasts with the pink pants. Is Monday convenient for you? How do you deal with that awful child? Everything depends on the bus schedule. The airplane differs from the train. I differ with your argument. Nina is displeased with the plan. We are all fond of Mrs. Marco. The child was grateful for a snow day.
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Essentials of Business Communication
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 14 / Exercise 14.8
Essentials of Business Communication
Guffey/Loewy
Expert Verified
M i Part 2 : Under the Grammar tamer grateful to (someone) identical with interested in interfere with object to protect against reason with responsible for shocked at similar to specialize in take advantage of worry about We are grateful to the doctor. This cake is identical with hers. Chris is interested in martial arts. Homework can interfere with you social life. We object to the income tax hike. An umbrella protects against rain. You can't reason with a two-year-old. I am responsible for bringing the salad. We are shocked at your hair color! It is similar to a rainbow. The hairdresser must specialize in humor. They surely take advantage of kids! I worry about you. The Least You Need to Know Nouns name a person, place, or thing. Verbs express action, condition, or state of being. Conjunctions connect words or groups of words. Prepositions link a noun or pronoun to another word.
Chapter Terms of Endearment: More Parts of Speech In This Chapter Learn the other four parts of speech: adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, and interjections See how words are put together to create meaning As you learned in Chapter 3, English words are divided into eight different parts of speech according to their function in a sentence. In this chapter, you explore the remaining four parts of speech: adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, and interjections. (Hey, would I cheat you? You get all eight for your money!) Adjectives: Happy Little Clouds Adjectives are words that describe nouns and pronouns. They're the color commentators of language, the words that give your writing and speech flavor. Adjectives answer the questions "What kind?" "How much?" "Which one?" and "How many?" For example: What kind? red nose, gold ring How much? more sugar, little effort
M l P a r t 2 : Under the Grammar Hammer Which one? second wife, those nuts How many? several wives, six husbands Spice Up Your Sentences with Adjectives There are five kinds of adjectives: common adjectives, proper adjectives, compound adjectives, articles, and indefinite adjectives. 1. Common adjectives describe nouns or pronouns. strong man green plant pretty child You Could Look It Up Adjectives are words that modify—describe or limit— nouns and pronouns. 2. Proper adjectives are formed from proper nouns. California vegetables Mexican food 3. Compound adjectives are made up of more than one word, like these two examples: far-off country teenage person 4. Articles are a special type of adjective. There are three articles: a, an, and the.

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