5 This photo shows a before and after aspect of the land affected by Hurricane

5 this photo shows a before and after aspect of the

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This photo shows a before and after aspect of the land affected by Hurricane Katrina. The first picture was taken before the storm and shows narrow sandy beaches and adjacent over wash sandflats, low vegetated dunes, and back barrier marshes broken by ponds and channels. The bottom image shows the same location two days after the storm made landfall. Storm surge and waves submerged the islands, stripped sand from beaches and eroded large sections of the marsh. 6
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The federal government seemed unprepared for the disaster when it hit New Orleans. FEMA took days to establish operations in New Orleans. The Superdome was used as a shelter for people who had nowhere to go. There were limited supplies, so tens of thousands of people were deprived of food, water and shelter. These people broke into the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center Complex, but they found nothing but chaos. People found it impossible to leave the city. Hurricane Katrina killed nearly 2,000 people and affected 90,000 square miles of the United States. This hurricane created long term impacts for the entire city. The poor people were mostly affected and harmed the worst. Post hurricane, New Orleans has become a laboratory for science, technology, hazard insurance, and public policy. Now, New Orleans’s levee system only provides 1-in-100 year protection. 122 levees in the system are not considered to be inadequate for the increased severity of wind fields and storm surges expected in the future. While manmade chaos is an armed conflict and can be avoided, natural chaos comes from a natural disaster and is inevitable. Hurricane Katrina was a natural disaster that created a great deal of chaos. However, the mitigation remedies for natural disasters can help decrease the chaos. As a protection strategy, a three-layered system called “defense in depth” has been devised to protect the city. Each layer acts like a speed bump to absorb and reduce the energy and destructive effects of the severe windstorm. It is essential to educate citizens of the potential dangers and teach them how to respond in each disaster. The GEOINT Technology Vision which
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  • Fall '17
  • Storm surge, Tropical cyclone

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