Layer II III V most efferents arise from here going to the lower level of CNS

Layer ii iii v most efferents arise from here going

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**Layer II, III, V: most efferents arise from here (going to the lower level of CNS: spinal cord or brain stem) Layer VI: projects to the thalamus; efferent
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stellate is in layer IV; pyramidal is in layer V; layer IV is thickest afferent layer; layer V is thickest efferent layer Vertical columnar organization - cytoarchitecture/ “chunks”; functional organization (homunculus) Divergent pathways Good for parallel processing Column size is experience dependent; changes with injury and learning Implications: If the patient loses a limb; they still have the limb area in the brain so if you ask them to flex their arms they can still have signals?? If you play an insturment a lot this area is very senitive It is better if you learn piano at younger age If you have injury the columb size gets weaker or smaller How the cell body is linked together Projections classifications Subcortical (projection fibers) : impulses to/from subcortical areas (thalamus, brainstem, s.c., cerebellum) Projections from cortical to subcortical areas?? Occur between higher brain centers and spinal cord Could be ipsilateral, bilateral, or contralateral Association: connect neurons within a hemisphere (ex. Synergists share “rich” connections) Example: MI receives inputs from SMA and PM ONE hemisphere Pg. 244 (red fibers going from frontal to occipital are association fibers) Commissural: connect neurons to the contralateral hemisphere (ex. corpus
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  • Spring '14
  • HONDZINSKI

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