A tunisian revolution jasmine revolution the tunisian

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A. Tunisian Revolution: Jasmine Revolution The Tunisian Revolution is an intensive campaign of civil resistance, including a series of street demonstrations taking place in Tunisia and was initially spread via social media such as Facebook. The events began in December 2010 and led to the ousting of longtime Presidentof Tunis in January 2011. Street demonstrations and other unrest have continued to the present day [61]. The protestors were precipitated by high unemployment, food inflation, governmental corruption, a lack of freedom of speech and other political freedom and poor living conditions. The protests constituted the most dramatic wave of social and political unrest in Tunisia in three decadesand have resulted in scores of deaths and injuries, most of which were the result of action by police and security forces against protestors. The protests were sparked by the self-immolation of young man on December 17 and led to the ousting of President of Tunis 28 days later on 14 January 2011, when he officially resigned after fleeing to Saudi Arabia, ending 23 years in power. B. Egyptian Revolution: Egyptian youth revolution After the Tunisian revolution,the protests has inspired similar actions throughout the Arab world; the Egyptian revolution began after the events in Tunisia and also led JOURNAL OF ADVANCES IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 2, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2011213© 2011 ACADEMY PUBLISHER
to the ousting of Egypt's longtime president of Egypt.Furthermore, protests have also taken place in Algeria, Yemen, Libya, Jordan, Bahrain, Iraq, Mauritania,[13]Pakistan[14]and elsewhere in the wider Middle East and North Africa [61]. Egypt has witnessed two examples of the power of social networks with Web 2.0 technology facilities such as Facebook and Twitter. The first challenge of the government was in 2008 in Egypt, where criticism of the president and political protests are illegal [28]. With growing concern about rising bread prices and government corruption, some young Egyptians began a call for a national strike on April 6. Facebook was already a popular social network in Egypt, especially amongst young people, who started a Facebook group for the strike in that time, and it quickly gained over 70,000 members. April 6 saw riot police swarming Tahrir Square (Freedom Square), a central gathering area in downtown Cairo, as well as universities, factories, and other areas where the government anticipated political activity, which had a chilling effect on most potential strikers [24]. The summer of 2009 showed Twitter to be a powerful tool of communication in Iran’s green revolution, when protestors used the social media service to share news with each other and with those internationally, without government filters [25]. Twitter users and other social media users have found ways around government filtering and blocks of certain technologies. For example, people can update their Twitter status from their mobile phones. In Cuba, political blogger Yoani Sanchez emails text for her blog, “Generation Y,” to friends in other countries, who then post her entries and reply with comments made to previous blog entries [26]. Some bloggers post updates to

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