Identify a group of which you are a member It can be a work group a class

Identify a group of which you are a member it can be

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80. Identify a group of which you are a member. It can be a work group, a class project team, a social organization, etc. Now answer the following questions: 1. What stage of development is that group in today? 2. What are the individual and group issues facing the group during this stage of development? 3. How can these issues be addressed? The five stages are: Stage 1: Forming During the ice-breaking forming stage, group members tend to be uncertain and anxious about such unknowns as their roles, the people in charge, and the group’s goals. Mutual trust is low, and there is a good deal of holding back to see who takes charge and how. Some research shows that conflict among group members is actually beneficial during this stage. For instance, early conflict in product development teams can boost creativity. However, the results can also be quite different. For example, in the life-and-death situations sometimes faced by surgical teams and airline cockpit crews, the uncertainty inherent in the early stages of development (forming and storming) can be dangerous. Stage 2: Storming The storming stage is a time of testing. Individuals test the leader’s policies and assumptions as they try to decide how they fit into the power structure. Subgroups may form and resist the current direction of a leader or another subgroup. In fact, some management experts say the reason many new CEOs don’t survive is that they never get beyond the storming stage. Many groups stall in Stage 2 because of the way the use of power and politics can erupt into open rebellion. Stage 3: Norming Groups that make it through Stage 2 generally do so because a respected member, other than the leader, challenges the group to resolve its power struggles so work can be accomplished. Questions about authority and power are best resolved through unemotional, matter-of-fact group discussion. A feeling of team spirit is sometimes experienced during this stage because members believe they have found their proper roles. Group cohesiveness, defined as the “we feeling” that binds members of a group together, is the principal by-product of Stage 3. Stage 4: Performing Activity during this vital stage is focused on solving task problems, as contributors get their work done without hampering others. This stage is often characterized by a climate of open communication, strong cooperation, and lots of helping behavior. Conflicts and job boundary disputes are handled constructively and efficiently. Cohesiveness and personal commitment to group goals help the group achieve more than could any one individual acting alone. Stage 5: Adjourning The group’s work is done; it is time to move on to other things. The return to independence can be eased by rituals such as parties and award ceremonies celebrating the end and new beginnings. During the adjourning stage, leaders need to emphasize valuable lessons learned. AACSB: Analytical Thinking AACSB: Teamwork Blooms: Understand Difficulty: 3 Hard
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  • Fall '17
  • Mary Lynn Hanik
  • Group development, AACSB, Keyboard Navigation

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