Relevant intellectual traits the key intellectual

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Relevant Intellectual Traits : The key intellectual trait required at this stage is some degree of  intellectual humility in beginning to recognize the problems inherent in thinking. In addition, thinkers  must have some degree of intellectual confidence in reason, a trait which provides the impetus to  take up the challenge and begin the process of active development as critical thinkers, despite  limited understanding of what it means to do high quality reasoning. In addition, beginning thinkers  have enough intellectual perseverance to struggle with serious problems in thinking while yet lacking a clear solution to those problems (in other words, at this stage thinkers are recognizing more and  more problems in their thinking but have not yet discovered how to systematize their efforts to solve  them). Some Implications for Instruction : Once we have persuaded most of our students that much of  their thinking - left to itself - is flawed and that they, like all of us, are capable of improving as  thinkers, we must teach in such a way as to help them to see that we all need to regularly practice  good thinking to become good thinkers. Here we can use sporting analogies and analogies from  other skill areas. Most students already know that you can get good in a sport only if you regularly  practice. We must not only look for opportunities to encourage them to think well, we must help them to begin to understand what it is to develop good HABITS of thinking. What do we need to do  regularly in order to read well? What must we do regularly and habitually if we are to listen well?  What must we do regularly and habitually if we are to write well. What must we do regularly and  habitually if we are to learn well? We must recognize that students are not only creatures of habit,  but like the rest of us, they are largely unaware of the habits they are developing. They are largely  unaware of what it is to develop good habits (in general), let alone good habits of thinking. If our  students are truly “beginning” thinkers, they will be receptive to the importance of developing sound  habits of thought. We must emphasize the importance of beginning to take charge of the parts of  thinking and applying intellectual standards to thinking. We must teach students to begin to  recognize their native egocentrism when it is operating in their thinking.
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