lab2soln

Sample problem 2 in this problem you are not allowed

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Unformatted text preview: Sample Problem 2 In this problem you are NOT allowed to use the theorems about Big-Oh stated in the lecture notes. Your proof should follow just from the definition of Big-Oh. (As usual in problems with Big-Oh, we assume that the functions map nonnegative reals to strictly positive reals.) Prove Theorem 5 on slide 30 of Lecture Notes 2, that is, prove that for any(all) f,g,h,k if f ( n ) is O ( h ( n )) and g ( n ) is O ( k ( n )) then f ( n ) + g ( n ) is O ( h ( n ) + k ( n )). Answer Assume f ( n ) is O ( h ( n )) therefore ∃ N 1 ,c 1 > 0 such that ∀ n ≥ N 1 we have f ( n ) ≤ c 1 h ( n ). Assume also that g ( n ) is O ( k ( n )) therefore ∃ N 2 ,c 2 > 0 such that ∀ n ≥ N 2 we have g ( n ) ≤ c 2 k ( n ). We want to show that these assumptions imply that ∃ N 3 ,c 3 > 0 such that ∀ n ≥ N 3 we have f ( n ) + g ( n ) ≤ c 3 ( h ( n ) + k ( n )). From f ( n ) ≤ c 1 h ( n ) and g ( n ) ≤ c 2 k ( n ), we can add the sides of these two inequalities obtaining f ( n ) + g ( n ) ≤ c 1 h ( n ) + c 2 k ( n )....
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Sample Problem 2 In this problem you are NOT allowed to use...

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