Placing the patient on a backboard forces blood down the back of the throat and

Placing the patient on a backboard forces blood down

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Placing the patient on a backboard forces blood down the back of the throat and causes vomiting. Try to encourage the patient to spit out as much as possible, and consider placing the board on the side and/or packing the nose.
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28 In general, an airway obstruction is characterized as partial or complete. It can be cause by soft tissue, solids, or liquids. These classifications make it easier to recognize airway obstructions.
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29 Complete airway obstruction: condition in which a foreign object or soft tissue completely occludes the flow of any air into the lungs IT IS ONE OF THE MOST RAPIDLY FATAL CONDITIONS AND MUST BE RECOGNIZED AND TREATED QUICKLY. Because no air is being moved, a patient with a complete airway obstruction is silent.
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30 A conscious patient is anxious and may clutch at the throat. Patient may attempt to be alone and try to run to a restroom. There will be little chest wall excursion; no air will move.
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31 If the obstruction is not cleared, the patient will lose consciousness, usually within a few minutes. An unconscious patient with complete airway obstruction is in respiratory arrest. Respiratory arrest: the absence of respiration You will recognize the obstruction when attempts to ventilate the patient do not work.
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32 In some patients with complete airway obstruction, the basic attempts to remove the obstruction may be unsuccessful.
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33 If the patient is unconscious, the use of direct laryngoscopy and Magill forceps may be the only way of removing the obstruction.
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34 Incomplete airway obstruction: condition in which a foreign object or soft tissue partially occludes the flow of air into the lungs Classified as having good or poor air exchange
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35 They are more common than complete airway obstructions, but they are more difficult to identify and classify. Patients can exchange some air. Breathing is noisy, which helps to identify the obstruction.
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36 Patients with good air exchange are anxious but can exchange enough oxygen and carbon dioxide to maintain consciousness. They generally have labored breathing with intercostal and suprasternal retractions; oxygen saturation may be normal. Retractions: concavity of the soft tissue overlying bone in the thoracic cage during inhalation; a sign of increased work of breathing
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37 Conscious patients with poor air exchange cannot exchange enough air to maintain oxygen saturation. Identify these patients quickly and relieve the obstruction before they lose consciousness.
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38 Signs of poor air exchange: a dusky skin color or cyanosis, a decreasing level of consciousness, and falling oxygen saturation levels Cyanosis: a bluish tint of the mucous membranes and nail beds; a late sign of hypoxemia
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39 The most common cause of partial airway obstruction in unconscious patients is soft tissue, specifically the tongue and epiglottis.
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  • Spring '14
  • Hemoglobin, airway obstruction, Oxygen saturation

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