5 Uncover the primary emotion that is disguised as anger While interacting dos

5 uncover the primary emotion that is disguised as

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5. Uncover the primary emotion that is disguised as anger. While interacting: dos and don’ts, -Speaking more loudly or yelling -Standing over another person or invading their personal space -Making threatening gestures -Poking or pushing or shoving another person -Swearing and cursing -Engaging in threats or using a “thromise” -Bring in unrelated issues sensitive to the other -Mocking the other -Working to increase a competitive atmosphere or encouraging rivalry -Not listening to the person at whom you are angry, or allowing yourself to begged on by bystanders -Expressing anger under the influence of alcohol or drugs
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Chapter 5 Violent Tendencies · Culture of Violence Theory: large societies such as the United States, people from subgroup that develop values and norms justifying the use of physical force that exceeds the level that the larger culture might tolerate General Aggression Model: -Violence is chosen, or not chosen, based on the way the following factors interact: personal and situational variables, the present internal state of the actor, and the appraisal and decision process · Interpersonal violence defined: - It occurs when a person imposes his or her will on a friend, romantic partner, and family member through verbal or physical intimidation. Violence has physical, emotional, and mental effects. The degree of violence can range from relatively minor to extreme acts of physical aggression, torture and bodily harm. Identifying the potentially violent communicator: They tend to interrupt, dominate and stereotype others. They may engage in intense, glaring eye contact, put forward an invading posture as they bear down on others, and emit an arrogant air about them. They may try to dominate others by being loud, abrasive, blaming, intimidating and sarcastic. Verbal abuse: attacking the self-concept of another person in order to cause psychological pain for the other Physical violence: Usually starts early in life. It consists of physical harm to others. They are less argumentative because they are less able to voice their position. The inability to argue verbally to establish and support different positions is a major contributor to physical and verbal violence. Gender differences: Men are more likely to resort to physical violence toward their female partners than vice versa. · Two types of interpersonal violence: The interpersonal violence: 1. Violence cycles begin with perceptions of unresolved conflict that color the perception of a current triggering effect 2. The cycle may begin in disagreement, but escalate into verbal abuse 3. The conflict may end here, unresolved, and leaving a bad memory
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4. In some cases, verbal abuse may escalate into physical aggression, when one or both parties physically attack the other 5. at some point, physical aggression stops, either by the participants themselves or by a third party 6. Such behavior results in the individual feeling victimized The chilling effect cycle: in which one person in a relationship withholds grievances from the other, usually due to fear of alienating the other person or fear from the other person’s severe reaction. The chilling effect is distinctive because it includes an element of fear. The steps are:
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