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7-1 Milestone Three.docx

Older employees are not typically interested in

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and 40s with children and mortgages often need flexibility and room for advancement. Older employees are not typically interested in training as they are nearing the end of their careers, instead they look for interesting work and a work-life balance. Understanding the different life paths of employees will allow for properly managing and motivating the team (Knight, 2014). Another strategy is to create the opportunity for cross-generational mentoring. This type of mentoring pairs younger workers with seasoned executives to work on specific business objectives. Younger employees grew up with the internet and can often teach an older employee technology and social media opportunities. On the other hand, the older employee can share institutional knowledge with the younger employee (Knight, 2014). It’s important to also consider other differences in the workforce, such as gender and race. Noe et al. (2017) states that by 2022 the workforce is expected to be 78% white, 12%
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P a g e | 3 African American, 6% Asian and 4% other groups. Strategies to manage a culturally diverse workforce include creating an organizational culture that values diversity, facilitating higher career involvement of women, promoting knowledge and acceptance of cultural differences and dealing with employees’ resistance to diversity. (Noe et al., 2017, p. 38). Risk Management With an emphasis on enforcing current employment laws and regulations, employers must be proactive in eliminating discrimination, harassment, and unethical behaviors as well as promoting workplace safety. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) ensures that all individuals have an equal opportunity for employment, regardless of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin. (Noe et al., 2017, p. 111). The EEOC is responsible for enforcing equal employment opportunity (EEO) laws such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, The Equal Pay Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 sets strict rules for corporate behavior and sets heavy fines and possible imprisonment for noncompliance. To comply with this act, HR and management needs to develop a code of conduct, conduct ethics audits, and respond to ethical violations. (Noe et al., 2017, p. 40-41). The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) authorizes the federal government to establish and enforce occupational safety and health standards for all places of employment engaging in interstate commerce. (Noe et al., 2017, p. 132). It is imperative that HR policies and practices are implemented to prevent EEO violations and charges of discrimination that could put the organization at risk of crippling lawsuits. There are many actions that HR and management can take to prevent this risk including emphasizing EEO values, policies and procedures through new-employee onboarding and ongoing training,
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P a g e | 4 investigating employee complaints thoroughly and consistently, and creating an open-door EEO conflict resolution process. (SHRM, 2018). Ensuring that the company is not violating legal regulations is important, but HR policies must be implemented to ensure that employees are not engaging in illegal and unethical practices. Providing harassment prevention training can assist in mitigating risk by providing employees with knowledge on what behaviors can be construed as harassment and what they can do to prevent harassment in the workplace.
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  • Spring '16
  • Corporate social responsibility

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