Motivating others 6 Time and stress management 7 Planning 8 Organizing 9

Motivating others 6 time and stress management 7

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Motivating others 6. Time and stress management 7. Planning 8. Organizing 9. Controlling 10. Receiving and organizing information 11. Evaluating routine information 12. Responding to routine information 13. Understanding yourself and others 14. Interpersonal communication 15. Developing subordinates 16. Team building 17. Participative decision making 18. Conflict management 19. Living with change 20. Creative thinking 21. Managing change 22. Building and maintaining a power base 23. Negotiating agreement and commitment 24. Negotiating and selling ideas Learning About Yourself Exercise Scoring Key Director: 1, 2, 3 Mentor: 13, 14, 15 Producer: 4, 5, 6 Facilitator: 16, 17, 18 Coordinator: 7, 8, 9 Innovator: 19, 20, 21 Monitor: 10, 11, 12 Broker: 22, 23, 24 Breakout Group Exercises Form small groups to discuss the following topics: Consider a group situation in which you have worked. To what extent did the group rely on the technical skills of the group members vs. their interpersonal skills? Which skills seemed most important in helping the group function well? 2. Identify some examples of “worst jobs.” What conditions of these jobs made them unpleasant? To what extent were these conditions related to behaviours of individuals?
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3. Develop a list of “organizational puzzles,” that is, behaviour you’ve observed in organizations that seemed to make little sense. As the term progresses, see if you can begin to explain these puzzles, using your knowledge of OB. Working With Others Exercise This exercise asks you to consider the skills outlined in the “Competing Values Framework” to develop an understanding of managerial expertise. Steps 1–4 can be completed in 15–20 minutes. Using the skills listed in “Learning About Yourself,” identify the 4 skills that you think all managers should have. Identify the 4 skills that you think are least important for managers to have. In groups of 5–7, reach a consensus on the most-needed and least-needed skills identified in Steps 1 and 2. Using Exhibit 1-7, determine whether your “ideal” managers would have trouble managing in some dimensions of organizational demands. Competing Values Framework Internal-External Dimension Inwardly, toward employee needs and concerns and/or production processes and internal systems or Outwardly, toward such factors as the marketplace, government regulations, and the changing social, environmental, and technological conditions of the future Flexibility-Control Dimension Flexible and dynamic, allowing more teamwork and participation; seeking new opportunities for products and services or Controlling or stable, maintaining the status quo and exhibiting less change Exhibit 1.7: Skills for Mastery in the New Workplace
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