Blacks are getting too demanding in their push for equal rights It is a bad

Blacks are getting too demanding in their push for

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Blacks are getting too demanding in their push for equal rights It is a bad idea for blacks and whites to marry one another Blacks should not push themselves where they are not wanted If a black family with about the same income and education as I have moved next door, I would mind a great deal Over the past few years, blacks have gotten more economically than they deserve It was wrong for the United States Supreme Court to Outlaw segregation in its 1954 decision Over the past few years, the government and news media have shown more respect to blacks than they deserve
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The Modern Racist sees “true” discrimination being over and done with, and so many responses to this “illusory discrimination” by Blacks are considered problematic. The belief that Blacks push for inclusion in areas where jobs or rights aren’t directly on the line is one factor here, as is a belief that the demands made by Blacks are unfair and the gains they’ve realized are false, being the product of unfair assistance. The Modern Racist certainly doesn’t consider themselves racist, partially as a result of that first component “discrimination is over.” Racism is burning crosses, etc. The thing is, the negative affect still persists, and much like the mechanisms of aversive racism, influences people’s behaviors. Modern Racists see their actions not as endorsing racism, but as “upholding true equality” or “standing for American Values,” something which leads to a lot of overlap with the concept of symbolic racism. Rather similar in nature to modern racism, symbolic racism also alters the definition of the concept in order to find a more relevant construct for today’s world. Kinder & Sears (1981) contend that the key point is an almost veneration of “traditional” (read: Protestant, conservative) American values. The symbolic racist denigrates others based on their not endorsing or living up to these best of all possible values. Unfortunately, there are a couple of catches. First, the symbolic racist gets to define the vales, and surprise surprise, the values almost exactly coincide with the values they themselves hold. Second, they still have negative affect towards the outgroup, which leads (as we recall) to a biased perception of the outgroup. In a practical sense, this means it’s very hard for someone in a group not living up to the “right” values to ever be able to do so; they will typically be perceived as lacking in some way. Note this little two-step allows the symbolic racist to express beliefs that are effectively racist, but avoid censure from self and others because the ostensible cause is a value issue, not a race issue. References McConahay, J. (1986). Modern racism, ambivalence, and the Modern Racism Scale. In J. Dovidio & S. Gaertner (Eds.), Prejudice, discrimination, and racism (pp. 91-125). Orlando, FL: Academic Press. Swim, J., Aikin, K., Hall, W., & Hunter, B. (1995). Sexism and racism: Old-fashioned and modern prejudices. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 68, 199-214.
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  • Spring '14
  • Barr,CliffordBrooks,,Jr.
  • Discrimination, Sanderson, benevolent sexism

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