Variation in non critical activity may cause change in critical path Trade Offs

Variation in non critical activity may cause change

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Variation in non critical activity may cause change in critical path Trade-Offs and Project Crashing It is not uncommon to face the following situations: The project is behind schedule The completion time has been move forward Shortening the duration of the project is called project crashing Steps in Project Crashing Compute the crash cost per time period. If crash costs are linear over time: Crash cost per period = (Crash cost – Normal cost) over (Normal time – Crash time) Using current activity times, find the critical path and identify the critical activities If there is only one critical path, then select the activity on this critical path that (a) can still be crashed, and (b) has the smallest crash cost per period. If there is more than one critical path, then select one activity from each critical path such that (a) each selected activity can still be crashed, and (b) the total crash cost of all selected activities is the smallest. Note that the same activity may be common to more than one critical path. Update all activity times. If the desired due date has been reached, stop. If not, return to Step 2. Advantages of PERT/CPM Especially useful when scheduling and controlling large projects Straightforward concept and not mathematically complex Graphical networks help highlight relationships among project activities Critical path and slack time analyses help pinpoint activities that need to be closely watched Project documentation and graphics point out who is responsible for various activities Applicable to a wide variety of projects Useful in monitoring not only schedules but costs as well Limitations of PERT/CPM Project activities have to be clearly defined, independent, and stable in their relationships Precedence relationships must be specified and networked together Time estimates tend to be subjective and are subject to fudging by managers There is an inherent danger of too much emphasis being placed on the longest, or critical, path
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  • Spring '08
  • levi
  • Project Management, Critical path method, Activity Times, specific activities

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