Treatment options are dependent on whether the UTI is uncomplicated or

Treatment options are dependent on whether the uti is

This preview shows page 6 - 8 out of 8 pages.

and sensitivities. Treatment options are dependent on whether the UTI is uncomplicated or complicated. Uncomplicated UTIs will often respond to adequate hydration and oral antibiotics. Cipro, Bactrim DS, Macrodantin, or Augmentin are good choices. Pyridium can be considered torelieve pain or dysuria. The recommended course is three days and 10-14 days for those with pyelonephritis. In the emergency room where I work, the use of the rule of two’s is employed. IVfluid of normal saline 1 liter x2 for a total of 2 liters, two Tylenol #3, and 2grams of ceftriaxone
Background image
WEEK 10: URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS (UTIS)7IV. Complicated UTIs are a bit more challenging, and the drug of choice depends on the presumed infective agent and the spread of the infection. Standard antibiotics include ceftriaxone, tobramycin, Keflex, or invanz. The usual course of treatment is 10-14 days. UTIs in males are usually considered complicated because pyelonephritis is high, longer antibiotic therapy is considered. Similarities and DifferencesThe similarities and differences in upper and lower UTIs surround the anatomy, causes and treatment modalities. Upper UTIs are treated with IV antibiotics, and lower UTIs are treated with the administration of oral antibiotics. This, of course, is a simple generalization. Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common diseases, occurring from the neonate up to the geriatric age population. It is critical for the advanced practice nurse (APN) to fully understand the differences and similarities to ensure the proper diagnosis. UTI is one of the leading causes ofGram-negative sepsis in hospitalized patients and after renal transplantation (Schmaldienst & Horl, 2007). There are significant differences in the management of patients on the definition of UTI, diagnosis, and treatment. There remains controversy as to the treatment or nontreatment of low-count bacteriuria and asymptomatic UTI because of the incidence of multi-system drug resistance.
Background image
WEEK 10: URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS (UTIS)8ReferencesBenson, A. (2016, ). Renal corticomedullary abscess. The Journal of Urology, 0(0), 74-82. Harrington, R. D., & Hooton, T. M. (2014, Nov-Dec). Urinary tract infection risk factors and gender. The Journal of Gender-Specific Medicine, 3(8), 27-34. Howes, D. S., & Pillow, W. T. (2010). Urinary Tract Infection, Male. Retrieved from Huether, S. E., & McCance, K. L. (2012). Understanding pathophysiology (Laureate custom ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby.McPhee, S. M., & Papadekis, M. A. (2009). Current Medical Diagnosis & Treatment. San Francisco: McGraw-Hill Medical.Mehnert-Kay, S. A. (2012, ). Diagnosis and management of uncomplicated urinary tract infections. American Family Physicians, 27(3), 1-9.National Institute of Health. (2016). Cystitis - acute. Retrieved from Schmaldienst, S., & Horl, W. H. (2007, ). Bacterial infections after renal transplant. Nephron, 75(140), 140-153.
Background image

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture