Attorney Christopher M Loeffler 2012 explains that traditional privacy laws did

Attorney christopher m loeffler 2012 explains that

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ity to anticipate the technological advances. Attorney Christopher M. Loeffler (2012) explains that traditional privacy laws did not anticipate the social media environment. States have been trying to pick up the federal government's legislative slack on Internet privacy issues. Jonathan Strickland, a Texas state representative, says, "Congress is obviously not interested in updating those things or protecting privacy. If they're not going to do it, states have to do it” (Sengupta 2013, Ai). State efforts have not yet focused on amending library privacy laws to embrace other types of information seeking. Library privacy protection laws were created long before the social media age and, like the nation’s privacy laws, failed to anticipate the ways technology would change the character of library use (Garoogian 1991, 230).
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Social M edia Privacy 267 Some of the existing legislative patchwork consists of state laws regulating who inherits digital data, including Facebook passwords, when social media users die (Sengupta 2013). Cal- ifornia enacted a law giving children the right to erase social media posts, making it a mis- demeanor to publish identifiable nude pictures online without the subject's permission, and requiring social media companies to tell consumers whether they abide by "do not track" set- tings on web browsers (Sengupta 2013). Currently, most state legislation focuses on protecting the privacy of employees who use social media. Wisconsin lawmakers are following New Jersey and Washington State in a trend to introduce legislation prohibiting potential employers from requesting job applicants' social media passwords (Heaton 20t4). Ten other states have conflicting social media laws that, on one end of the spectrum, prohibit employers from making "friend" requests to employees and, on the opposite end, specifically permit employers to view employees' public social me- dia pages (Dunning 2013). Scattered and inconsistent state laws deal with tiny facets of social media privacy in different ways, but there is no comprehensive 50-state solution to social media's privacy invasions in the legal framework of the United States. Lack of cohesive legislation protecting social media users’ privacy counters the desires of the American public. According to the Pew Internet Center, 86% of United States citizens take steps to conceal their identity online. Americans feel that existing laws are inadequate to protect Internet privacy, and most feel that they have to go to great lengths to protect themselves (Sengupta 2013). A majority of Internet users clear browsing histories, delete social media posts, and use virtual networks to conceal their Internet addresses to proactively pro- tect their privacy on their own in the absence of legal privacy guarantees (Pew Research Cen- ter 2013a). P revalence o f Social M e d ia in H u m a n Life With twee insignia that includes Twitter bird tweets and Facebook thumbs-ups, some dismiss social media as merely a passing trend in a sea of cultural fads. Those who deny social media’s
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