How Did the Dust Bowl Affect Americans The Dust Bowl is sometimes called a man

How did the dust bowl affect americans the dust bowl

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How Did the Dust Bowl Affect Americans? The “Dust Bowl” is sometimes called a man-made natural disaster. The drought and rising temperatures of the 1930s were a natural disaster. But the dust storms were man-made, the result of decades of over cultivation. These “black bliz- zards” scoured and buried homes, ruined vehicle engines, and diminished visibility. The blowing dirt could injure eyes and damage lungs; it even suffocated people. As the drought destroyed their livelihood, and the dust storms destroyed their belongings, many farmers abandoned the land, packed up their families, and fled the region in search of work elsewhere. 120°W 40°N 30°N Ida. Ore. Nev. Calif. Utah Ariz. N. Mex. Colo. Wyo. N. Dak. S. Dak. Nebr. Kans. Iowa Minn. Okla. Tex. Fargo Los Angeles Fresno Grand Junction Bakersfield Flagstaff Albuquerque Santa Fe Denver Kansas City Minneapolis Oklahoma City Omaha Dallas Tulsa Houston # D M S Q @ K 6 @ K K D X PACIFIC OCEAN Area with severe loss of topsoil Area with moderate loss of topsoil Movement of people Destination of Dust Bowl emigrants State with population loss, 1930–1940 400 miles 400 kilometers 0 0 Albers Equal-Area projection N S W E 1. Movement Which states lost population in the 1930s? In which direction did most people fleeing the Dust Bowl move? 2. Human-Environment Interaction Study the image at right. What problems and dangers does the dust storm create? The drought on the Great Plains in the 1930s was the worst ever recorded in U.S. history. Summer temperatures soared above 110 degrees in many locations setting records that still stand. The lack of water and fierce heat dried the soil to a fine dust. An estimated 200 million acres of land lost some or all of its topsoil. photo credit
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Chapter 18 The Great Depression 639 The fine grit of dust storms could clog car engines and other mechanical devices beyond repair. Dust storms towered thousands of feet in the air and moved rapidly across the open plains. When a storm hit, it became dark outside, and visibility often dropped to only a few feet. People raced for cover when a storm hit. The grit stung the skin and eyes. Breathing the dust could cause dust pneumonia. Many people, especially children and senior citizens became sick, and many died. Many farmers in the dustbowl, such as Elmer Thomas and his family of Muskogee, Oklahoma (above), decided to leave the region. Many became migrant workers, traveling from across the west in search of short-term employment.
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640 Chapter 18 The Great Depression Begins Section 3 Guide to Reading Big Ideas Government and Society President Hoover’s ideas about government shaped his response to the Great Depression, making the government slow to respond. Content Vocabulary public works (p. 640) relief (p. 642) foreclose (p. 643) Academic Vocabulary series (p. 640) community (p. 641) People and Events to Identify Reconstruction Finance Corporation (p. 641) Bonus Army (p. 643) Reading Strategy Categorizing As you read about Herbert Hoover’s response to the Depression, create a graphic organizer listing his major initiatives and their results.
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