Although Costas net passenger ticket revenue yields increased they were more

Although costas net passenger ticket revenue yields

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the ongoing challenging economic environment in Europe. Although Costa’s net passenger ticket revenue yields increased, they were more than offset by decreases at our other European brands. Gross cruise revenues increased slightly by $75 million and remained at $15.2 billion in both 2013 and 2012 for largely the same reasons as discussed above. Net cruise costs excluding fuel increased $525 million, or 8.0%, to $7.1 billion in 2013 from $6.6 billion in 2012. The increase was caused by a 4.6% increase in constant dollar net cruise costs excluding fuel per ALBD, which accounted for $313 million, our 2.9% capacity increase in ALBDs, which accounted for $189 million, and the 2013 net currency impact, which accounted for $23 million. The 4.6% increase in constant dollar net cruise costs excluding fuel per ALBD was caused by: $56 million – additional costs and expenses related to the 2013 Carnival Triumph voyage disruptions, net of third-party insurance recoverables of $20 million; $46 million – additional ship repair and maintenance expenses; $44 million – higher advertising spend; $40 million – new market development initiative costs; $34 million – nonrecurrence in 2013 of Costa’s excess insurance proceeds and Cunard’s litigation settlement ; $20 million – higher insurance premiums; $15 million – MNOPF special expense assessment and $87 million – various other operating expenses, net. These increases were partially offset by: $29 million – nonrecurrence in 2013 of the 2012 Ship Incident related expenses. Fuel costs decreased $173 million, or 7.3%, to $2.2 billion in 2013 from $2.4 billion in 2012. This was caused by a 5.3% decrease in fuel consumption per ALBD, which accounted for $131 million, and lower fuel prices, which accounted for $111 million, partially offset by our 2.9% capacity increase in ALBDs, which accounted for $68 million. Gross cruise costs increased $473 million, or 4.0% to $12.4 billion in 2013 from $11.9 billion in 2012 for principally the same reasons as discussed above. 2012 Compared to 2011 Revenues Consolidated Cruise passenger ticket revenues made up 76% of our 2012 total revenues. Cruise passenger ticket revenues decreased by $500 million, or 4.1%, to $11.7 billion in 2012 from $12.2 billion in 2011. 50
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This decrease was caused by: $434 million – decrease in cruise ticket pricing; $282 million – a stronger U.S. dollar against the euro and sterling, net of a weaker U.S. dollar against the Australian dollar (“2012 net currency impact”) and $82 million – slight decrease in occupancy. These decreases were partially offset by: $348 million – 2.9% capacity increase in ALBDs. Our cruise ticket pricing and occupancy were affected by the direct and indirect consequences of the 2012 Ship Incident and the challenging economic environment in Europe. The remaining 24% of 2012 total revenues were substantially all comprised of onboard and other cruise revenues, which increased by $156 million, or 4.6%, to $3.5 billion in 2012 from $3.4 billion in 2011.
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