Introduction to compare is to point out similarities

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Chapter 14 / Exercise 4
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Introduction To compare is to point out similarities; to contrast is to point out differences. As you approach a writing assignment, you need to be able to do both. For instance, in an essay on fruit production, you might recognize ways that oranges and lemons are similar: both of them are citrus fruits that pro- duce juice and have flavorful rinds. You could then contrast them in terms of color, sweetness, and typical uses for each in the American diet. Comparing and contrasting should make a point. For exam- ple, a comparison and contrast of two political parties may seek to prove that one party is more progressive or conserva- tive than another. In a similar sense, comparing and contrasting a vegetarian diet with one containing meat may be used to support a thesis on the health benefits of one or the other. The “Writing Quick Start” for this chapter, on page 365, asks you to compare and contrast the experience of playing in an amateur band made up of a few friends and playing in a pro- fessional band. The exercise consists of making two lists—one listing the similarities (comparisons) and one list- ing the differences (contrasts) between the two kinds of experience. When something can be read without effort, great effort has gone into its writing. —Enrique Jardiel Poncela
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South-Western Federal Taxation 2020: Individual Income Taxes
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Chapter 14 / Exercise 4
South-Western Federal Taxation 2020: Individual Income Taxes
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Lesson 5 115 Reading Highlights Pages 366–369 While distinguishing between similarities and differences isn’t difficult, writing effective comparisons and contrasts requires discrimination, balance, flow, and all the other characteris- tics of good writing. It also requires organization, of which there are two types: point-by-point and subject-by-subject. For example, imagine you’re looking at two photographs depicting a scene from a wedding. In one, you see the full “Hollywood” church-wedding fantasy. The bride wears a wed- ding gown. She is attended by bridesmaids while a young girl holds the train of her dress. The groom wears a tuxedo. The nuptial pair stands before an altar where a priest or pastor stands ready to officiate. The second photo is of a couple standing before a justice of the peace. The bride wears a tai- lored suit, as does the groom. The room looks rather like an office, and there are no witnesses. You could use a point-by- point approach to compare the attire of the two brides, the attire of the bridesmaids, or the nature of the audience, then contrast the settings of the two wedding scenarios. Or you could use a subject-by subject approach in which you would describe key facets of the first photo, and then detail the con- trast in the second photo. You decide which approach to use based on your purpose and on the parallelism of the shared characteristics—that is, you may not be able to make a one- to-one correlation for all the same points for each item. What if the justice of the peace wedding photo remained as it is but the church wedding photo depicted the reception for the newly married pair? Although you would probably draw simi- lar conclusions about the similarities and differences, you

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