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Third witch anon all fair is foul and foul is fair

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Third WitchAnon.ALLFair is foul, and foul is fair:Hover through the fog and filthy air.ExeuntWhy do you think the witches have been interpretedin so many ways?(see clip)Macbeth: Act OneSummary: Act 1, Scene 2At a military camp near his palace at Forres, King Duncan of Scotland asks a wounded captain fornews about the Scots’ battle with the Irish invaders, who are led by the rebel Macdonwald. Thecaptain, who was wounded helping Duncan’s son Malcolm escape capture by the Irish, replies thatthe Scottish generals Macbeth and Banquo fought with great courage and violence. The captain thendescribes for Duncan how Macbeth slew the traitorous Macdonwald. As the captain is carried off tohave his wounds attended to Ross, a Scottish nobleman, enters and tells the king that the traitorousthane of Cawdor has been defeated and the army of Norway repelled. Duncan decrees that thethane of Cawdor be put to death and that Macbeth, the hero of the victorious army, be givenCawdor’s title. Ross leaves to deliver the news to Macbeth.Act 1, Scene 2: King Duncan’s Camp Near ForresKey ExtractSergeant:Doubtful it stood;As two spent swimmers, that do cling togetherAnd choke their art. The merciless Macdonwald--Worthy to be a rebel, for to thatThe multiplying villanies of natureDo swarm upon him--from the western islesOf kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,Which smoked with bloody execution,
Like valour's minion carved out his passageTill he faced the slave;Which ne'er shook hands, nor bade farewell to him,Till he unseam'd him from the nave to the chaps,And fix'd his head upon our battlements.DUNCAN:O valiant cousin! worthy gentleman![...] No more that thane of Cawdor shall deceiveOur bosom interest: go pronounce his present death,And with his former title greet Macbeth.ROSS:I'll see it done.DUNCAN:What he hath lost noble Macbeth hath won.Annotate the killer quote here... (AO2)Homework TasksLook up and define the following terms...Tragic Hero:Hamartia:Aristotle’s Elements of a Tragic HeroResearch what this is and write a definition below.Don’t just copy from the internet – write it in a way you actually understand!__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Code of Chivalry and Being ChivalrousThe Code of Chivalry was a moral system which went beyond rules of combat and introduced the concept ofChivalrous conduct - qualities idealised by the Medieval knights such as bravery, courtesy, honour and greatgallantry toward women. It also incorporated the notion of courtly love. The Code of Chivalry was the honourcode of the knight. The Code of Chivalry was an important part of the society and lives of people who livedduring the Medieval times and was understood by all.

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