Research report - National Child Labour Action Programme for South Africa (1).doc

The majority of the activities making up the clap

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were also consulted to ensure that the proposals would mesh with budgetary plans. The majority of the activities making up the CLAP already forms part of government policy. In these cases the programme confirms that these activities contribute to addressing child labour. Where appropriate, it proposes that implementation be strengthened. In some cases, the CLAP suggests a variation of an existing programme or policy which will allow it to combat child labour more effectively. Neither of the above two types of proposals will involve significant expenditure or other resources from government.
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Page 6 Executive summary Draft 4.10, October 2003 In a few cases, the CLAP proposes new activities, some of which will necessitate new expenditures. These are clearly identified in the programme document. For each activity – whether existing, a variation of existing, or new – the programme identifies whether once-off and ongoing costs will be minimal, moderate or significant. The Department of Labour will undertake a costing exercise regarding at least those items identified as being moderately or significantly costly. Key elements of the CLAP are: Targeting the rollout of government and other stakeholders’ programmes and policies on poverty, employment, labour and social matters more effectively in areas where the work that children do has serious negative affects on them; Promoting new legislative measure against worst forms of child labour; Strengthening of national capacity to enforce legislative measures; Increasing public awareness and social mobilization against the worst forms of child labour. Large-scale projects with significant financial demands and substantial human resource requirements have been avoided since they will not be realistic or sustainable. In a few cases, however, action steps have been included which may have significant cost implications. The most important of these is the proposed extension of the qualifying age for the child support grant by 2006 from 13 years to the end of the school year the child turns 15 so as to avoid the current contradiction with the Basic Conditions of Employment Act prohibiting child work below that age, as well as the provisions on compulsory schooling. The programme also proposes a further roll out of the child support grant up to the age of 17 by 2008. This will encourage children to remain in school and so help to avoid children’s engagement in hazardous works activities and other WFCL.
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Chapter 1. Introduction 1.1 The need for a Child Labour Action Programme Children are the future of any country. There are various factors hindering the welfare and development of children in South Africa. One such factor is the involvement of children in the worst forms of child labour. Other factors include children engaged in other forms of work that are likely to be bad for their development.
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