Results estimated amount of glass on the ground is a function of the intensity

Results estimated amount of glass on the ground is a

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Results : estimated amount of glass on the ground is a function of the intensity of the verb use to ask the question (smashed VS contacted) Misinformation effect : hypothesis that misleading post-event information can become integrated with the original memory of the event. Midterm 2 PSYC 213
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Memory quirks : False Memories When we experience an event and later receive misleading information about it, we may not recognize that the source of that information is something other than the event itself. Source monitoring framework : theory that some errors of memory are caused by mistaken identification of the memory’s source. Deese-Roediger-McDermott effect Study a list of associated words that has a strong associate/prototype but that prototype is not present on the studied list. E.g. Nap – Bed - Rest At test : Free recall or recognition test with words from the list and the associated prototype. E.g. Nap – Bed – Rest - Sleep Midterm 2 PSYC 213
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People will mistakenly remember the non-studied prototype = False memory Midterm 2 PSYC 213
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Types of False Memories The misattribution effect A failure in source monitoring. Retrieving information that is assigned to a wrong source. The misinformation effect The effect of leading questions on false memory formation (E.g. asking if cars smashed into each other or hit each other). Implanted memories Asked people to recall childhood experiences recounted by their parents over three experimental sessions, but a false memory was added to the list of experiences by the experimenter. 20% of people had a false memory of this event by the end of the experiment. Midterm 2 PSYC 213
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Tip of the finger The TOT phenomenon can occur in sign language. Deaf signers asked to name famous faces or countries (proper names) The signers reported knowing the name but not remembering the full sign. The signers could remember some components of the sign (e.g., shape of the hands, but not how to orient them). *Very similar to spoken language TOT. Cognitive Aging : Domain-general theories Older adults… have deficits in general cognitive processing – executive functions are slower at processing information are unable to inhibit irrelevant information E.g., trouble focusing on one picture and ignore all other pictures on a wall. Midterm 2 PSYC 213
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Cognitive Aging : Associative deficit hypothesis Definition : older adults have problems forming and remembering the associations or links between items more than they have problems remembering items. E.g. Older adults can remember a face, but may not be able to remember where they met that person (associate face to place). Experiment : Face-Name associations Older adults were able to do good on recognition task, but did worse than young-divided attention group in associations. Midterm 2 PSYC 213
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Cognitive Aging : Impairments of specific types Episodic memory is by far the most affected by cognitive aging.
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  • Winter '08
  • LEVITIN
  • Memory processes, memory disorder, Semantic Dementia, The Unconscious

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