True rape culture beliefs such as the idea that men

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Rape culture beliefs (such as the idea that men are "naturally" more sexually aggressive), normalize the coercive behaviors (such as getting women drunk and blocking doors) that are used by male students in Armstrong's study to get women to have sex with them. True According to a study by the American Psychiatric Association, girls who looked at objectifying material were more likely to have low self-esteem, to become depressed, and develop eating disorders, proving that the "toxic sexual culture" discussed in Sexy Inc. has real effects on girls. True Romantic scripts such as "prince charming" and "waiting for the one" are carefully embedded within many contemporary mediated scripts of sexuality. True Karen Sternheimer argues in her 2010 article "Fear of Sex: Do the Media Make Them Do It?" that sex is associated with maturity and status because adults define it that way and because pop culture is saturated with sexual imagery. True Stephens' (2010) research found that sexual scripts are influential in African American preadolescent decision making processes about sexual activity and behavior, so they can provide an accessible way for researchers to understand how African American preadolescent females makes sense of sexuality. True According to Adina Nack's article, "Damaged Goods," despite the fact that 3 out of 4 sexually active adults have HPV and 1 out of 5 have genital herpes, most sociological research on sexual health, stigma, and the self focuses on HIV infection, which effects 1 out of 300 sexually active adults. True While the prevalence of the vibrator was liberating for many women, it also created a number of anxieties, Juffer (1998) argues, such as becoming alienating by the technology of the vibrator, as well as becoming dependent on a machine for orgasms. True
In Nash and Bain's discussion of "Reclaiming Raunch," the traditional butch-femme binary expressed in biologically female bodies is commonly displayed in the "queer" spaces of the "women's" bathhouse. True The cultural practice of "transitioning" from male to female, or female to male, emerges from a belief that individuals are either male OR female, rather than neither or both. True Today, more than half of international funding for AIDS prevention comes from the U.S. State Department and relies on the ABC framework (abstinence, being faithful, and condom use). According to Mukherjee (2007), this is problematic because it relies on the idea of personal choice and the agency to carry out those choices. True Within "raunch" culture or what is sometimes referred to as the "porno-ization" of culture, women are expected to appear sexy and perform pleasure, but are NOT expected to actually experience sexual pleasure. True In "In Search of (Better) Sexual Pleasure" (2005), Virginia Braun examined data from BOTH the media AND from speaking to actual surgeons in her article to better understand how FGCS is socially constructed and framed as enhancing female sexual pleasure, specifically orgasm.

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