His obsession feeds him with the infernal fuel from hell giving him a Satan

His obsession feeds him with the infernal fuel from

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His obsession “[feeds him] with [the] infernal fuel” from hell, giving him a “Satan”-like distinction (112). Chillingworth, like Dimmesdale, is trapped in his own mind. The guilt or obsession is able to overwhelm the two characters and hold them hostage, driving them towards insanity. Hawthorne thus presents the reader with the argument that humans are completely susceptible to their emotions. Guilt and obsession are particularly dangerous because of the significant impact these two feelings have on our minds. We have the capability to feel remorse and are therefore mentally weak. This weakness also represents itself in obsession, as our minds can become so transfixed on a singular goal that they are unable to break loose. Hawthorne therefore suggests conflicting ideas; the mind is so powerful that it can control itself, yet it is often too weak to overcome its own power. As seen in many themes throughout the ages, a human’s greatest obstacle to overcome is itself. Whether it be how Macbeth’s paranoia leads himto insanity, or how Dimmesdale decomposes physically and mentally due to guilt, these strong emotions play key roles in the wellbeing of individuals, whatever the century.
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