Options 1 2 and 4 acknowledging poor interpersonal

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Issues and Ethics in the Helping Professions
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 3
Issues and Ethics in the Helping Professions
Corey/Corey
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(Options 1, 2, and 4) Acknowledging poor interpersonal skills, identifying new coping mechanisms, and verbalizing sources of conflict and anger are important but will not be the focus during hospitalization. These long-term outcomes will be addressed during ongoing therapy. Educational objective: Treatment for a client requiring hospitalization for anorexia nervosa should focus on the short-term outcomes of increasing caloric intake, promoting gradual weight gain, and addressing medical conditions caused by starvation. Mental Health Concepts Anorexia Nervosa - Therapeutic Communication Test Id: 52098897 Question Id: 30920 (729561) 20 of 20
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Issues and Ethics in the Helping Professions
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 3
Issues and Ethics in the Helping Professions
Corey/Corey
Expert Verified
A A A After a daily weigh-in, a client with anorexia nervosa realizes a 2-lb weight gain. The client says to the nurse in a distressed voice, "This is terrible. I'm so fat." What is the best response by the nurse? Unordered Options Ordered Response 1. "But you look so thin." 2. "I don't see you that way; you are making progress toward a healthy weight." 3. "If you continue to gain weight at this rate, you will be able to go home soon." 4. "You are not fat; it's all in your imagination." You answered this question correctly. Time Spent: 4 Seconds 85% of people answered this question correctly. Last Updated: 11/30/2015 Explanation A nursing diagnosis associated with anorexia nervosa is disturbed body image/low self esteem. There is often a large disparity between actual weight and the client's perceived weight. Clients with anorexia nervosa think of themselves as overweight and fat. The nursing care plan should include helping the client develop a realistic perception of weight and body image. The nurse can confront the client about the misinterpretation of body weight by presenting reality without challenging the client's illogical thinking. The client's weight should be discussed in the context of overall health. The nurse also needs to be aware of his/her own reaction to the client's behaviors and statement. It is not uncommon for caregivers and care providers to feel frustrated or even angry when caring for a client with an eating disorder. The nurse must maintain a neutral attitude and approach, avoiding arguing or disagreeing with the client's statements.
(Option 1) This response is judgmental, reinforces the idea of "thinness," and does not help the client develop a more realistic body image. (Option 3) Establishing a goal weight is part of the nursing care plan for the client with anorexia nervosa; clients are usually not discharged from inpatient treatment until goal weight is achieved. However, this response does not address the client's misperception of body weight. (Option 4) This response dismisses the client's concern and does not present the reality of the situation. Educational objective: Clients with anorexia nervosa have disturbed body image and see themselves as being fat or overweight even when they are severely underweight or even at a normal body weight. The nurse can help the client develop a more realistic self image by presenting the situation realistically and discussing weight in terms of the client's health.

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