150000 remained some living within the hispanic

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150,000 remained-some living within the Hispanic society the Spanish and Mexican settlers had created, many still living within their own tribal communities. The pueblos of the southwest had
long lived largely as farmers and had established permanent settlements there even before the Spanish (later Mexicans) produced, in effect, an alliance against the apaches, Navajos, and Comanches of the region. Poorly administered reservation Which of the following contributed to the decimation of American buffalo? Groups of gold-rush migrants, the army’s plan to rob Indians of their livelihood, killers hired by railroad companies, desire for buffalo hides among white American’s. Worsening the fate of the tribes was the white Anglos relentless slaughtering of the buffalo herds that supported the tribe’s way of life. Even in the 1850’s, whites had been killing buffalo at a rapid rate to provide food and supplies for the large bands of migrants traveling to the gold rush in California. After the civil war, the white demand for buffalo hides became a national phenomenon partly for economic reasons and partly as a fad. Everyone east of the Missouri seemed to want a buffalo robe from the romantic west, and there was a strong demand for buffalo leather, which was used to make machine belts in eastern factories. Gangs of professional hunters swarmed over the plains to shoot the huge animals. Railroad companies hired riflemen (such as buffalo bill Cody) and arranged shooting expeditions to kill large numbers of buffalo, hoping to thin the herds, which were obstructions to railroad traffic. Some Indian tribes (notably the Blackfeet) also began killing to sell in the booming market. Labor in the west Which of the following made hiring difficult for businesses in the west? Distance from populated areas. Drought Which of the following were ways western farmers increased water supplied to their crops? Some farmers dealt with the problem by using deep wells pumped by steel windmills, by turning to what was called dryland farming (a system of tillage designed to conserve moisture in the soil by covering it with a dusk blanket) or by planting drought-resistant crops. Much of the land west of the Mississippi was considerably more arid than the lands to the east. Some of it was literally desert. As a result, the growth of the west depended heavily on irrigation-providing water from resources other than rainfall. Water was diverted from rivers and streams and into farmlands throughout the west-in California and in the southwest more than anywhere else. In other areas, farmers drilled wells or found other methods of channeling water onto their lands. The search for water-the resulting battles over control of water (between different landowners and even between different states) became a central and enduring characteristic of the western life.

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