These disadvantaged students considered higher

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education. These disadvantaged students considered higher education “not worth it”, and accepted their status due to the overwhelming symbolic boundaries. The Mexican-American students also understood the reality of the difference of their cultural capital with their white counterparts, as when one such student went to visit the homes of two of her white friends. During her visits, although one of the friends seemed to match the cultural capital and vibe of the Mexican-American student, the other instead “made her feel poor” (124). With that knowledge in mind it is understandable that a Mexican-American female, aware of both the symbolic boundaries placed unto her and the cultural capital she possesses, would not view higher education, a place generally seemed “for” white students with more cultural capital, as a place for her to succeed; a similar experience for the disadvantaged students of MU. Ultimately, it can be assumed that the organizational imperatives, affected by the symbolic boundaries present in that school, produce a great effect on the students attending. Such effects include stratification between the classes of students, bringing to light the difference in cultural capital and other advantages or disadvantages between students. Although some students excel in these environments, usually white students of the middle to upper middle class, the
Lee5 disadvantages placed on the other students cause them to lose interest in academia as a whole. The data and observations from these two studies show the negative effects that symbolic boundaries, and the awareness of different levels of cultural capital, can have on students in a place where it shouldn’t matter: education. Though there is evidence that the organizational imperatives of higher education and the symbolic boundaries affecting students based on their cultural capital is detrimental to the mission and initial purpose of higher education, it is a pattern that has spread across many other large public universities aside from MU, and for students hoping to shift their class standing, it would be more effective to attend a smaller university.
Lee6 Works Cited Armstrong, Elizabeth A., and Laura T. Hamilton. Paying for the Party: How College Maintains Inequality. Harvard University Press, 2015. Bettie, Julie. Women without Class: Girls, Race and Identity. University of California Press, 2014.

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