This has helped to perpetuate the other issues of

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income and minority residents. This has helped to perpetuate the other issues of health disparity, lack of employment, and less funding for schools or education. 10Janelle Hanson, “THE BELOVED COMMUNITY: @TheU,” TheU, last modified October 26, 2015, accessed July 9, 2020, .11Ibid12Jeff Ritterman, “The Beloved Community: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Prescription for a Healthy Society,” HuffPost(HuffPost, December 7, 2017), last modified December 7, 2017, accessed July 9, 2020, -dr-_b_4583249?guccounter=1.13“Racism and Health,” AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION, last modified 0AD, accessed July 7, 2020, .14Ibid. 15Nicki Lisa Cole, “Understanding Systemic Racism,” ThoughtCo, last modified June 11, 2020, accessed July 10, 2020, .16N'dea Yancey-Bragg, “What Is Systemic Racism? Here's What It Means and How You Can Help Dismantle It,” USA Today(Gannett Satellite Information Network, June 19, 2020), last modified June 19, 2020, accessed July 10, 2020, .
March’s logic of appropriateness suggests that rules are followed in organizations (government included) because they are seen as natural, rightful, and legitimate. The issue with this is that it is not necessarily based in morality. Rather, it is “a matching of rules to situations” that are based on the “identities of the actors.”17Sure, this logic of appropriateness can establish order, strength, and predictability in organizations and agencies, but there is a downside to it as well. Often, “it is associated with inefficiency, rigidity, and incrementalism.”18As stated by Jörg Balsiger, “In contemporary democracies, rules provide procedural and substantive fairness and protect individuals from the power of authorities and resource-rich actors. In an increasingly complicated institutionalized environment, however, the scope of action based on tacit understanding increases, as do the political opportunities of individuals with economic or intellectual resources.”19The other issue with this is that people will follow the rules for fear of consequences rather than some inherent sense of righteousness. Goodin talks about Rule-consequentialism. The idea that the rules are just that, the rules. All rules should be followed no matter what. This theory “selects rules solely in terms of the goodness of their consequences and then claims that these rules determine which kinds of acts are morally wrong.”20There is one glaring problem I see with this, however.This does not focus on how the rules can be harmful to people of color or those in disadvantaged communities. Consequentialism can result in immoral acts being identifiedas moral acts due to the mere fact that the outcome (or consequence) of that act is not wrong or considered good. What might be bad for one person or group of people can

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