Natureself interested motivates ppl to commit

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nature=self interested, motivates ppl to commit crime=situational, every1 wants to commit crimes that benefit them, control urges; invested in conventional society-have more to lose=less likely deliq, deliq peers effect-doesn’t matter Self control theory- ppl seek gratification, controlled for it, controls internal- bonds unimportant, self control developed=early childhood Social bond- stops from committing crime/bonded to conventional society: attachment- family- how close, commitment- what do u have to lose/future/skl, involvement - conventional activity- no time for nonconventional Decent daddy-watches out for other/sets ex/exert control/respected stable job/social control role in jeopardy: deindustrialization Black inner city gma-crim norms passed down, primary care provider Social strain theory- youths less access to means of production Social control theory- as u age penalties become more severe/u become more socially integrated-bonds stronger Greenberg: peak age for offense=adolescence, varies w offense, adults-less to gain and more to lose from crime; response to H&G: how soon one abandons deliq is related to normal sociological predictors, white/urban/F:earlier abandonment of delinq, changes from industrialization: modal age , rate of decline from mode Hirschi/Gottfredsson- invariant- doesn’t change across time/place, against social strain/control, not correlated w life course events, biological explanation crime Life course theory Sampson - institutions impt @ diff stages of life Structure(poverty) matters- influences kinds of bonds u have, busy=hard 2b good rents; Childhood deliq- linked to adult criminality Transitions- change likelihood to commit crime- more/less bonded to conventional instutions-skl/work/family, marriage crime-impt social bond, attachment, take resp Social class- not all crimes more common in lower class(white collar), relative(inequality) v absolute deprivation strain(inequality produces strain, everyone wants $ not all can get), control (poor parents less able to form strong bonds w children, less to lose, more willing- crime), subculture(strain, isolation, class appropriate-miller), social disorganization (lack resources hampers control) Assault -disad-resist, impt not look weak; robberies- disad-know how to handle, less likely injured; disad-guns more likely Race:class diff, discrimination, af.amer-more common=assaults;
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  • Fall '12
  • KristaM.Larsen
  • Sociology, Social control theory, Diff Assoc, Miller- diff culture, Social disorg theory

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