Vibrant work environments on patient safety work

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vibrant work environments on patient safety, work satisfaction of nurses, and organizational outcomes. Also cited are the 2002 study showing the link of high nursing workloads with burnout and emotional exhaustion of nurses and increased patient deaths, as well as the positive effects of better staffing like reduced cases of hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPI), sepsis, and heart failure. Henson, J. S. (2017). When Compassion Is Lost. MEDSURG Nursing, 26 (2), 139–142. Retrieved from ? direct=true&db=a9h&AN=122315820&site=eds-live&scope=site
CAPSTONE PROJECT TOPIC 9 Abstract : The article explains the implications of compassion fatigue in the nursing practice. Topics include the difference of compassion fatigue from burnout and secondary traumatic stress disorder, factors that can lead to compassion fatigue such as poor nursing staffing and environments and factors that can improve nurse compassion satisfaction. Also cited are measures for decreasing compassion fatigue such as resiliency programs and promotion of self- coping skills for trauma and oncology nurses. Knudson, L. (2013). Nurse Staffing Levels Linked to Patient Outcomes, Nurse Retention. AORN Journal, 97 (1), C1. Retrieved from ? url=? direct=true&db=edo&AN=84508212&site=eds-live&scope=site Abstract: The article discusses the effects of nurse staffing levels on patient outcomes in hospitals, focusing on administrative strategies for improving nurse retention. The author notes challenges facing nurses in terms of workload, burnout, and a national nursing shortage in the U.S., and special attention is paid to nurses' shift changes. Other topics include patient-to-nurse ratios, the impact of hiring attentional nurses on a hospital's profits, and nurse- management staffing committees. Lang, G. M., Pfister, E. A., & Siemens, M. J. (2010). Nursing Burnout: Cross-Sectional Study at a Large Army Hospital. Military Medicine, 175 (6), 435–441. - org.lopes.idm.oclc.org/10.7205/MILMED-D-09-00284
CAPSTONE PROJECT TOPIC 10 Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the levels of burnout among U.S. Army and civilian nursing personnel assigned to a large military treatment facility. Using a cross-sectional design, a convenience sample of eligible participants (n = 364) completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory. T-test and ordinal logistic regression were used to analyze data. Findings suggest that both groups were experiencing a moderate level of burnout. However, civilian nursing personnel demonstrated statistical lower levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Findings suggest that nursing personnel who worked the day shift, no more than 8 hours a day and had fewer patient care contacts with military personnel injured in Iraq or Afghanistan reported lower levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. This study provides ideas for policy changes at medical treatment facilities that are experiencing similar challenges.

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