Retrieval the process in which information in your memory can be recalled

Retrieval the process in which information in your

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Retrieval: the process in which information in your memory can be recalled Echoic memories: stored for slightly longer periods of time than iconic memories (visual memories). Selective attention: the process of focusing on a particular object in the environment for a certain period of time. Elaborative rehearsal: a memory technique that involves thinking about the meaning of the term to be remembered, as opposed to simply repeating the word to yourself over and over. Serial position effect: memory related term and refers to the tendency to recall information that is presented first and last (like a list) better than information processed in the middle. Decay theory: proposes that memory fades due to the mere passage of time. Retrograde amnesia: a loss of memory access to events that occurred, or information that was learned, before an injury or the onset of a disease. Memory trace decay theory: states that forgetting occurs as a result of automatic decay or fading of the memory trace; this theory focuses on time and the limited duration of short-term memory; suggests short term memory can only hold information for between 15 and 30 seconds unless it is rehearsed. False positive: a result that indicates that a given condition is present when it’s not. Flashbulb memory: a highly detailed, exceptionally vivid ‘snapshot’ of the moment of circumstances in which a piece of surprising and consequential news was heard. Infantile amnesia: refers to the difficulty or inability that adults have in remembering detailed or episodic memories (memories where time, place and events can be identified) from early childhood, generally prior to age 3 or 4. Where are short-term memories probably stored? Frontal lobes How does information enter into short-term memories? rehearsal Make sure to read Section 6.7 “Elizabeth Loftus and Eyewitnesses”. She states that “memory is not an unchanging, stable process but rather is a constantly changing one,”. You will have an application question based on her research findings.
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What is the best way to convince someone that false information is true?
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  • Spring '17
  • John Jackson

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