c Similarities in background and attitudes Interviewers perceived interpersonal

C similarities in background and attitudes

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c. Similarities in background and attitudes : Interviewers perceived interpersonal attraction was found to influence interview ratings. For example if you are lucky, one of the interviewers could from your graduation college. d. Culture : Applicants with rural background and/or lack of accent were viewed less favorably than applicants with city back ground and a traditional name with or without an accent. The extent to which ratings of interviewee performance reflect certain constructs varies widely depending on the level of structure of the interview, the kind of questions asked, interviewer or applicant biases, applicant professional dress or nonverbal behavior, and a host of other factors. For example, some research suggests that applicant's cognitive ability, education, training, and work experiences may be better captured in unstructured interviews, whereas 329 Chapter 13 - Interviews – Rules of the Game
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applicant's job knowledge, organizational fit, interpersonal skills, and applied knowledge may be better captured in a structured interview. Further, interviews are typically designed to assess a number of theories. Given the social nature of the interview, applicant responses to interview questions and interviewer evaluations of those responses are sometimes influenced by constructs beyond those the questions were intended to assess, making it extremely difficult to separate out the specific constructs measured during the interview. 13.03 The Process 13.3.01 Normal interview A typical job interview has a single candidate meeting with, between one and three persons representing the employer; the potential supervisor of the employee is usually involved in the interview process. A larger interview panel will often have a specialized human resources worker. While the meeting can be over in as little as 15 minutes, job interviews usually last less than two hours. The bulk of the job interview will entail the interviewers asking the candidate questions about his or her job history, personality, work style and other factors relevant to the job. For instance, a common interview question is "What are your strengths and weaknesses?" The candidate will usually be given a chance to ask any questions at the end of the interview. These questions are strongly encouraged since they allow the interviewee to acquire more information about the job and the company, but they can also demonstrate the candidate's strong interest in them. When an interviewer asks about the weaknesses of a candidate, they are acknowledging the fact that they are not perfect. However, the interviewer is not really interested in their weaknesses but how they may make up for them. It also displays the skill of self-reflection and the pursuit for self-improvement Candidates for lower paid and lower skilled positions tend to have much simpler job interviews than do candidates for more senior positions. For instance, a lawyer's job interview will be much more demanding than that of a retail cashier.
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