1 Determine how much service is to be allocated to each class Architecture

1 determine how much service is to be allocated to

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1. Determine how much service is to be allocated to each class Architecture policies 2.Establish policies to determine how work is performed for each defined class C a p a ci ty A lloca t io n fo r thi s Pl Sys t em and Solution ArchitecUEngfnecr (Des i gn Authority) New Featu r es • Enablers We agree on the percentage of resources to be devoted to new Feature development vs . architecture at each boundary. We agree that the architect has design authority and prioritizes the work in that class. We agree that content authority (Product Management) prioritizes work in that class. We agree to jointly prioritize our work based on economics . We agree to collaborate so as to sequence work in a way that maximizes Customer value. Prod u ct and So l ut i on Manage m ent {Con t en t Aut h or i ty) u T ech D ebt and Maintenance SCALED AGILE f ©Scaled Agile, Inc. 4-43
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4.5 Estimate and forecast the backlog SCALED AGILE - · . . Relative estimating Agile Teams use story points and relative estimating to quickly arrive at estimates for size and duration for user stories Product Managers can use historical data to fairly quickly estimate the size of Features in story points as well Feature estimates can then be rolled up into epic estimates in the portfolio backlog Portfolio managers and other planners can use capacity allocation to estimate how long a portfolio epic might take under various scenarios SCALED AGILE f ©Scaled Agile, Inc 4-46
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Estimating in SAFe 1. Epics are broken down into potential Features during the Portfolio Kanban analysis stage 2. Potential Features are estimated in story points 460 - Typically performed at the PM-System Architect level, based on history and relative size
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- Individual teams are engaged as necessary 3. Feature estimates are aggregated back into the Epic estimate as part of the lightweight business case SCALED AGILE f ©Scaled Agile, Inc 4-47 Delivery estimate Estimating Features effort Estimating the effort needed to implement a Feature typically goes through a series of successive refinements. a PRELIMINARY Product Manager • (Relative) Size Estimate A > B > C REFINED Historical story points ACTUAL Bottom-up, team-based B = Y story points Estimate Dev teams $ ocity $ CostDelivery estimatehistory data SCALED AGILE f ©Scaled Agile, Inc 4-48
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Example: If a team has an average velocity of 40 points, and their cost is $40,000 per Iteration, then each story point costs -$1,000 $ $ Cost estimate Delivery estimate Estimating cost Once the Feature has been estimated in story points, a cost estimate can be quickly derived. Calculate the burdened cost for a team in an Iteration length Divide that by their Pl velocity to get average cost per story point SCALED AGILE f ©Scaled Agile, Inc 4-49 The business needs to forecast SAFe enhances enterprise adaptability, providing faster response to changing market opportunities Yet, the enterprise, its partners, and customers need to plan some sense of the future Estimating must: Be fast and efficient as possible to be reasonably accurate Support "what if' analysis of various implementation scenarios Traditional Work Breakdown Structure to task-level estimating binds the teams to waterfall practices SCALED AGILE f ©Scaled Agile, Inc 4-50
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  • Fall '19
  • Scaled Agile
  • Product Manager

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