Edward payne merchant standing at his door wounded

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Introductory Psychology
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 02
Introductory Psychology
Rathus
Expert Verified
Mr. Edward Payne, merchant, standing at his door; wounded. Messrs. John Green, Robert Patterson, and David Parker; all danger- ously wounded. The actors in this dreadful tragedy were a party of soldiers commanded by Capt. Prestonof the 29th regiment. This party, including the Captain, consisted of eight, who are all committed to jail. There are depositions in this affair which mention, that several guns were fired at the same time from the Custom-house; before which this shocking scene was exhibited. Into this matter inquisition is now making. In the meantime it may be proper to insert here the substance of some of those depositions. Benjamin Frizell, on the evening of the 5th of March, having taken his station near the west corner of the Custom-house in King street, before and at the time of the soldiers firing their guns, declares (among other things) that the first discharge was only of one gun, the next of two guns, upon which he the deponentthinks he saw a man stumble; the third discharge was of three guns, upon which he thinks he saw two men fall; and immediately after were discharged five guns, two of which were by soldiers onhis right hand; the other three, as appeared to the deponent, were discharged from the balcony, or the chamber window of the Custom-house, the flashes appearing on the left hand, and higher than the right hand flashes appeared to be, and of which the deponent was very sensible, although his eyes were much turned tothe soldiers, who were all on his right hand. What gave occasion to the melancholy event of that evening seems to have been this. A difference having happened near Mr. Grays ropewalk, between a soldier and a man belonging to it, the soldier challenged the ropemakers to a boxing match. The challenge was accepted by one of them, and the soldier worsted. He ran to the barrack in the neighborhood, and returned with several of his companions. The fray was renewed, and the soldierswere driven off. They soon returned with recruits and were again worsted. This happened several times, till at length a considerable body of soldiers was collected, and they also were driven off, the ropemakers having been joined by their brethren of the contiguous ropewalks. By this time Mr. Gray being alarmed interposed, and with the assistance of some gentlemen prevented any further disturbance. To satisfy the soldiers and punish the man who had been the occasion of the first difference, and as an example to the rest, he turned him out of his service; and waitedon Col. Dalrymple, the commanding officer of the troops, and withhim concerted measures for preventing further mischief. Though
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Introductory Psychology
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 02
Introductory Psychology
Rathus
Expert Verified
this affair ended thus, it made a strong impression on the minds of the soldiers in general, who thought the honor of the regimentconcerned to revenge those repeated repulses. For this purpose they seem to have formed a combination to commit some outrage upon the inhabitants of the town indiscriminately; and this was to be done on the evening of the 5th instant or soon after; as appears by the depositions of the following persons, viz.:

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