Chap4DunkleySegalBlanksteinCBTHandbookcognitiveassessmentchapter.1_3_2018.doc

The sentence completion test for depression scd eg

  • No School
  • AA 1
  • 58

This preview shows page 24 - 27 out of 58 pages.

The Sentence Completion Test for Depression (SCD; e.g., Barton, Morley, Bloxham, Kitson, & Platts, 2005) is a less structured measure of cognitive distortion in depression. It consists of 48 short sentence stems that tap known areas of depressive thinking (e.g., ‘I think …’. ‘Things in general …’). The sentence completions are coded as negative, positive, or neutral thoughts using a manual. Patients with depression have been found to produce more negative thoughts and fewer positive thoughts than controls. Despite its open-ended format, the SCD has demonstrated good construct validity, internal consistency, inter-rater reliability, sensitivity, and specificity. Moreover, the SCD elicits idiographic information that can be Cognitive Assessment 24
Image of page 24

Subscribe to view the full document.

helpful in identifying target problems and dysfunctional beliefs in the CBT case formulation (Barton et al., 2005). Cognitive Processes A variety of self-regulatory mechanisms have been implicated in the development and maintenance of depressive phenomenology. Theorists have suggested that excessive self-focused attention may be related to affective self-regulatory deficits (Carver & Scheier, 1982). One prominent measure of self-focused attention is the Self-Focused Sentence Completion (SFSC) task (Exner, 1973). The SFSC is a 30-item scale in which participants read sentence stems (e.g., "I wish..." or "When I look in the mirror...") and complete them any way they choose. In the scoring system by Exner (1973), the SFSC yields 10 scores: total self-focus (S); self-focus positive, negative and neutral; total external focus (E); external focus positive, negative and neutral; total ambivalent (A); and total neutral (N). Exner (1973) has reported adequate scoring reliabilities for both experienced and novice raters. A variety of studies have indicated that both mildly and clinically depressed individuals generate more self-focus responses, and fewer external-focus responses than nondepressives (e.g., Ingram, Lumry, Cruet, & Sieber, 1987). Another frequently-employed measure of self-focused attention is the Self-Consciousness Scale (SCS: Fenigstein, Scheier, & Buss, 1975). The SCS consists of three factor analytically- derived subscales: private self-consciousness (10 items); public self-consciousness (7 items); and social anxiety (6 items). The private self-consciousness subscale (e.g., "I'm always trying to figure myself out") is considered the dispositional equivalent of the self-focused attention state. This subscale's reliability and validity has been demonstrated in several studies (e.g., Fenigstein et al., 1975). It also has been shown to be significantly associated with depression (see Mor & Winquist, 2002). The Ruminative Response Scale (RRS) from the Response Styles Questionnaire (RSQ; Nolen-Hoeksema & Morrow, 1991) is a 22-item measure designed to measure dispositional Cognitive Assessment 25
Image of page 25
repetitive thinking about the causes, consequences, and symptoms of current negative affect. The RRS has demonstrated good internal reliability (see Samtani & Moulds, 2017; Smith & Alloy, 2009). The stability of RRS is critical in that rumination is proposed to be a reliable individual difference variable that plays a role in the onset, maintenance, and recurrence of depression. The
Image of page 26

Subscribe to view the full document.

Image of page 27

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern