34 task force on the united nations american

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34. Task Force on the United Nations, American Interests and UN Reform: Report of the Task Force on the United Nations , Wash- ington, DC: The United States Institute of Peace, 2005, esp. pp. 41-61. This quote is from p. vi; those in the following sentence are from p. 43. The report is available from usip_un_report.pdf . Further information about the UN Task Force is available from . 35. For example, see Steven Ruder, “Peacebuilding Expands Across Disciplines, Study Shows,” available from publications/peacebuilding-expands-across-disciplines-study-shows . 36. In this regard, it is worth exploring the emergent phenom- enon of “collective conflict management” characterized as a relatively new pattern of cooperation in international affairs with no organizational center or universal rules of the road. . . . A defining feature of these relatively cooperative ventures is that they span global, regional, and local levels in terms of their institutional membership or actor composition. Quote is from Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson, and Pa- mela Aall, eds., Rewiring Regional Security in a Fragmented World , Washington, DC; The United States Institute of Peace Press, 2011, p. 545.
133 CHAPTER 6 THE ROLE OF PEACEBUILDING AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT IN A FUTURE AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY: TIME FOR AN “OFF SHORE” APPROACH? Charles J. Dunlap, Jr. INTRODUCTION As the post-September 11, 2001 (9/11) wars in Iraq and Afghanistan wind down, it is the right time to examine the role of peacebuilding and conflict man - agement in a future American grand strategy. With the enormous cost in blood and money these efforts have tallied, it seems clear that nations, to include es- pecially the United States, need to consider alterna- tive approaches to accomplish their strategic goals. As unpopular as the recent conflicts have become in the American body politic, it seems inevitable that circumstances arise where peacebuilding and conflict management operations are needed. Accordingly, it is incumbent upon the Armed Forces to develop methodologies to accomplish these missions, and to do so in a way that is supportable by the public. The purpose of this chapter is to examine what that approach might be and how it might ad- dress the existing deficiencies in peacebuilding and conflict management techniques, and to do so in the context of an American grand strategy. It will propose an “off shore” approach, one that leverages American asymmetric capabilities, while realistically assessing the difficulties occasioned by manpower-intensive approaches that are extant. The chapter begins with
134 a discussion of the threshold questions, the ones that will provide the necessary context for the proposal: What is grand strategy? Does America have one?

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