Much of the literature concerning american political

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Much of the literature concerning American political pop has emphasized movement and protesttraditions.17Therefore, we chose to look at music and musicians associated with the following politicalmovements: environment, human rights, peace, and labor. Those movements and issues have garnered16K. Weglarz, “From music to voting blocs: An analysis of popular musicians and political persuasion,” paper presented atthe Annual Conference of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada,May 2008.17See D.Fischlin,Rebel Musics: Human rights, resistant sounds, and the politics of music making(Montréal: Black Rose Books,2003) and J. Rodnitsky, “The decline and rebirth of folk-protest music,” inThe resisting muse: Popular music and social protest,ed. I. Peddie (London: Ashgate. 2006), 17-29.
Political Pop, Political Fans? A Content Analysis of Music Fan Blogs5much of the attention in popular music and associated popular music research.18While disagreeingvociferously over the nature of mainstream popular culture, critics from both the Left and Right agreethat overtly politicized pop tends to evidence a leftward bent in the USA.19To develop an exogenous sample of “political musicians,” we administered a simple survey tolabor, peace, environmental, and human rights activists. They were asked for examples of musicianswho had influenced them in open-ended questions. General calls for participation in the survey wereposted on political discussion sites on the Web as well as via emails to organizational staffrepresentatives. 139 activists responded.20The 10 artists most often cited: Bob Dylan (listed by 29respondents), Rage Against the Machine (14), Pete Seeger (14), John Lennon (13), Phil Ochs (12),Woodie Guthrie (11), Bob Marley (9), Neil Young (9), Joan Baez (8), and U2 (7). Ten fan blogs werecollected for each of the 10 artists for a total of 100 blogs, using the same search engine and samplingprocess used to derive the first sample.The blog samples were then compared via computer-assisted content analysis. Linguistic Inquiryand Word Count (LIWC) software was used to test two basic hypotheses. Each blog was independentlyanalyzed using LIWC to determine the percentage of text in each that matches words in a dictionary ofpolitical terms. A mean percentage for each sample was then derived and the blog percentages werecompared via an independent samplesttest, using SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences)software.An Explanation of Computer Assisted Content AnalysisBefore presenting the hypotheses it is important to explain LIWC and dictionary-based computercontent analysis methodology, in general. LIWC testing is predicated on two basic assumptions. Thefirst is that the words in a given dictionary correspond in some meaningful way to the topic anddictionary label. The reader can judge whether or not that is the case with the dictionary of politicalterms we created to indicate political content.21These terms served as indicators of political discourse in

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