Landmines houthi forces laid numerous landmines

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Landmines Houthi forces laid numerous landmines, including banned antipersonnel mines in Yemen’s southern and eastern governorates of Abyan, Aden, Marib, Lahj and HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH WORLD REPORT 2016
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Taizz since July. Landmines and explosive remnants of war killed at least 23 peo- ple and wounded others, including two deminers, according to Yemeni mine clearance officials, medical professionals, and media reports. Antivehicle mines accounted for nine of those killed and five injured, although whether the mine is antivehicle or antipersonnel is often not detailed in report- ing. Human Rights Watch believes that the actual number of mine victims in Yemen may be much higher. Indiscriminate Attacks Before and since the coalition air campaign, Houthi and allied forces have used artillery rockets in indiscriminate attacks in the southern cities of Taizz, Lahj, al- Dale`a, and Aden, killing dozens of civilians. Houthis have also launched ar- tillery rockets into the southern Saudi Arabian border city of Najran and areas of Jizan province. Attacks on Health and Humanitarian Workers During 2015, at least three ICRC staff and two Yemen Red Crescent Society (YRCS) staff were killed while engaged in humanitarian operations. On July 31, the British Red Cross reported that a wounded patient died when a YRCS ambu- lance came under fire in Taizz. Houthi and allied forces engaged in military operations around Aden, Taizz, and other areas and opposing Southern forces repeatedly exposed hospitals, pa- tients, and health workers to unjustified risk. In one case in Aden, Southern forces sought cover in a hospital, putting its staff and patients in jeopardy. At least two civilians died and a nurse was wounded. According to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Af- fairs (OCHA), as of September 2015, at least 160 health facilities had closed due to insecurity caused by the conflict. In at least four instances, Houthi forces unlawfully detained aid workers attempt- ing to deliver medical supplies to healthcare facilities. HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH WORLD REPORT 2016
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HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH Children and Armed Conflict In 2015, the Houthis and other armed groups, including tribal and Islamist mili- tias such as Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), increased their recruit- ment, training, and deployment of children. According to UNICEF , by August 2015, armed groups had recruited 377 children, more than double those they re- cruited in 2014. At least 398 children were killed and 605 wounded between late March and August as a result of the fighting in the country. Under Yemeni law, 18 is the minimum age for military service. In 2014, the gov- ernment signed a UN action plan to end the use of child soldiers. Without an ef- fective government in place, the action plan has not been implemented.
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