reading of Hooks is establishing that there are incommensurable differences

Reading of hooks is establishing that there are

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reading of Hooks, is establishing that there are incommensurable differences between black andwhite feminists' readings of Madonna as a result of their different political, historical, social andracial positioning as subjects. Therefore femininity itself is articulated in terms of one's history,society and race.Rita Felski, in her article, 'The Doxa of Difference' positions the reading of Madonna by black andwhite feminists in a different light to Ang's interpretation. Felski argues,black and white feminist readings of Madonna are shaped by overlapping conceptual frameworksand discursive regimes... both partake of the distinctive, historically specific "language game" ofcultural studies in interpreting a media phenomenon such as Madonna as emblematic of broadersocial structures and processes.Felski therefore does not position the different readings of Madonna as creatingincommensurable differences between black and white feminists, rather she views the dialoguecreated by women of different races as one of, 'complicated entanglement, overlapping anddisagreement.' I, like Felski, believe there is possibility for constructive exchange between womenof different races however I, like Ang, also believe there are instances when the overlap falls awayand in these moments incommensurability occurs.Falling Down is the story of a day in the life of Bill Foster, a.k.a D-FENS. The film opens with thecharacter of D-FENS abandoning his car in peak-hour morning traffic. He sets out across LosAngeles to go 'home.' D-FENS is intent on returning 'home', to his ex-wife's house, to celebratehis daughter's birthday for whom he can no longer provide economically. En route D-FENS isinvolved in a series of confrontations, with a Korean storekeeper, Latino gang members, staff at afast food restaurant, a Neo-Nazi storekeeper and golfers at an exclusive golf course. He alsoencounters an African American protestor whose placard 'Not Economically Viable' appears toresonate with D-FENS. The structure of the narrative of Falling Down is built around the mundaneyet seemingly 'universal daily frustrations of contemporary urban life.' The middle-aged whitecop Prendergast traces D-FENS movements across Los Angeles and finally encounters him on thepier at Venice beach. Prendergast fatally shoots D-FENS, even though it turns out at this point D-FENS is only armed with a water pistol.
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The director Joel Schumacher constructs Falling Down as a film that 'simultaneouslyparticularized and universalized the condition of white masculinity.' In the monthly film magazineEmpire Schumacher described the film's white male protagonist, D-FENS as 'a seemingly ordinaryman ... [whose] release is so identifiable to all our angers.' Schumacher further referred to thescript as 'so representative.' Schumacher, later in the same article referred to the protagonist as'one of these invisible people that we don't pay attention to' an example of one of the 'manyarmies of men,' largely ignored by the contemporary American media. Schumacher's analysis of
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  • Fall '12
  • White people, White American, ang, D-FENS

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