TPA_tenure_Manual_.doc

In a continuous improvement model teachers regularly

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In a continuous improvement model, teachers regularly document and monitor their progress towards SMART Goals. Goals are expanded upon and adjusted as part of an on-going, collaborative professional growth model through professional development and reflective dialog with the principal and colleagues. Assessing progress towards goals requires analyzing multiple sources of data over time. The Teacher Performance Appraisal sets the expectation for teachers to use multiple sources of data as they assess personal progress towards professional growth goals as well as when they assess student understanding of content, process, and skill standards. June 2006 46
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(B-2) Teacher Goals Teacher Grade/Subject Principal or Designee School School Year S trategic - Will working towards this goal provide a return on investment that connects to broader goals (team, SIP, Division, etc.)? Strategic implies that the goal is clearly articulated and specific. M easurable - How will you see that change occurred? What concrete criteria will you use to measure change? A chievable - How far will this goal stretch you? Is it too far? Is it far enough? R esults-oriented – How will your work toward this goal affect student learning? How will your goal increase student achievement? T ime-bound - What deadlines and milestones exist for this goal? When will this goal be completed? SMART Goal: Principal or Designee Signature Date Teacher Signature Date ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ End-of-Year Data/Results and Next Steps Principal or Designee Signature Date Teacher Signature Date COPIES: PRINCIPAL TEACHER OBSRVER June 2006 47
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(B-3) Goal Progress Review (Optional) Teacher Date Subject School Collaborator Position Summarize progress to date based on the data sources agreed upon at the beginning of the school year and discussion of progress on goals. June 2006 48
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(C-1) Categories of Instructional Strategies (Marzano) June 2006 Strategy Research Says: Identifying similarities and differences Students should compare, classify, and create metaphors, analogies, and graphic representations. Summarizing and note taking Students should learn to delete unnecessary information, substitute some information, keep some information, write and rewrite, and analyze information. Reinforcing effort and providing recognition Teachers should reward based on standards of performance and use symbolic recognition rather than tangible rewards. Homework and practice Teachers should vary the amount of homework based on student grade level (less at the elementary level, more at the secondary level), keep parent involvement in homework to a minimum, state purpose, and, if assigned, should be commented on. Nonlinguistic representations Students should create graphic representations, models, mental pictures, drawings, pictographs, and participate in kinesthetic activity in order to assimilate knowledge.
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