Split order of a sentence divides the predicate into two parts with the subject

Split order of a sentence divides the predicate into

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Split order of a sentence divides the predicate into two parts with the subject coming in the middle In California oranges grow. Juxtaposition a poetic and rhetorical device in which normally unassociated ideas, words, or phrases are placed next to one another, creating an effect of surprise and wit The apparition of these faces in the crowd; /Petals on a wet, black bough. Parallel structure (parallelism) refers to a grammatical or structural similarity between sentences or parts of a sentence; it involves an arrangement of words, phrases, sentences, and paragraphs so that elements of equal importance are equally developed and similarly phrased He was walking, running and jumping for joy. Repetition a device in which words, sounds, and ideas are used more than once to enhance rhythm and create emphasis “…government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth” Rhetorical question a question that expects no answer; it is used to draw attention to a point and is generally stronger than a direct statement If Mr. Ferchoff is always fair, as you have said, why did he refuse to listen to Mrs. Baldwin’s arguments? Rhetorical fragment a sentence fragment used deliberately for a persuasive purpose or to create a desired effect Something to consider.
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Anaphora the repetition of the same word or group of words at the beginning of successive clauses “We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing-grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills.”
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