EDWARD R MURROW Grades 3 4 Chapter 5 Effective Communication Lesson Grades 3 4

Edward r murrow grades 3 4 chapter 5 effective

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~EDWARD R. MURROW~
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Grades 3-4 Chapter 5 Effective Communication Lesson: Grades 3-4 5.1 Take Ten “I Statements” Review Take Ten Principle #7; tell the students that a prize will be awarded at the end of the session for remembering it. Estimated time: 40-45 minutes Objective: x Students will identify ways to phrase a sentence that will tell someone how they feel and what they want to happen without escalating the conflict. Activity: 1. The students, by this stage, would have learned about being assertive and how to do so without escalating the conflict. Ask the students to tell you what they can remember about being assertive and if they have practiced anything that they learned from that session. Remind them that being assertive is standing up for yourself and telling others how you feel and what you want to happen without being violent . Ask for an example of what it would look like if someone was being assertive. 2. Tell the students that there are two different ways that you can say something. You can say something by using a “You” or an “I” statement. 3. Give the students an example of what a “You” statement is “you are always pushing people around” – and ask them how they would feel if someone used a “You” statement when talking to them. Ask them if they feel like they are being accused of something. 4. When using an “I” statement it is important to claim your rights. First, address the person by name. Tell them to do a Take Ten. Here is an example of how a Take Ten “I” statement might sound. TAKE TEN PRINCIPLE #7: Every person has the right to choose how they will solve problems and express themselves.
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Grades 3-4 Chapter 5 Effective Communication Lesson: Grades 3-4 5.1 Hey Andrew, chill out! I am starting to get angry. I don’t like it when you call me wire teeth. I want to be respected for the way I am and I’d like to talk to you about why you call me names. 5. Then show the students how to make up an “I” statement. We encourage you to use the first example because we feel it is more representative of the way that students speak to each other. _______(the person’s name)_________ (tell them to do a Take Ten). I’m _________ (state what you are feeling) and I don’t like it when you________ (state the action you don’t agree with). I want_______ (st ate something that you want/value [to feel comfortable, to be left alone, to be respected, etc.]). And I’d like to _______(specific request [talk it out, understand, etc.]). 6. Practice “I” statements with the students, using the following scenarios, and reinforce the positive impact that an “I” statement can have on a conflict: a. Marcus borrowed Jacob’s markers and forgot to return them . b. Ashley and Emil were sharing Emil’s crayons for an art project and Ashley accidentally took Emil’s crayons . c. Paul is bouncing a ball and Heather keeps trying to take it away from him.
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