First Amendment Press Clause o A false statement may be overlooked if done

First amendment press clause o a false statement may

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First Amendment: Press Clause o A false statement may be overlooked if done unknowingly and without malice. o Prior restraint limits the right of the press. Fourth Amendment: prohibiting unreasonable search and seizure o Exclusionary Rule - Evidence gathered in violation of the Constitution cannot be used in a trial. o Good-Faith Exception - An error in gathering evidence sufficiently minor that it may be used in a trial. o Probable Cause - Reasonable cause for issuing a search warrant or making an arrest; more than mere suspicion. o Inevitable Discovery - If the evidence would have been found out anyways in time, the courts are able to use it in their case. Fifth Amendment: rights of the accused o Grand Jury Indictment - criminal procedure clause requires that a felony offense in a federal court be charged by a grand jury. o Double Jeopardy Protections - This prohibits the government from forcing a person to repeated trials for the same crime. o Privilege Against Compelled Self Incrimination - The defendant in a case may chose not to testify. o Due Process Clause - The government must act in accordance with legal rules and not oppose them. o Takings Clause - Public property cannot be taken without compensation (emanant domain) Sixth Amendment: rights in a trial
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o The right to a quick and speedy trail o The right to be informed of nature and cause of accusation o The right to confront and cross-examine the witness o The right to an attorney Fourteenth Amendment: Due Process and Incorporation Doctrine o The Amendment states no state shall “deprive any person of life, liberty or property without due process of the law” and no state shall “deny any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws” o Since the Amendment claimed states could not deny people of equal protection, the Supreme Court was able to apply fundamental rights and amendments to the states o The only Amendments not applied to the states are Three, Five, Seven, and Eight. o Due Process - Denies the government the right, without due process, to deprive people of life, liberty, and property. o Selective Incorporation Doctrine - The process whereby the Court has applied most, but not all, parts of the Bill of Rights by claiming these rights to be “ fundamental
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Chapter Six: Civil Rights Civil Rights: definition o A group that is denied access to facilities, opportunities, or services available to other groups o Issue is whether differences in treatment are reasonable Reasonable: Progressive tax Unreasonable: Segregation on a bus Discrimination: African Americans o De facto segregation- Racial segregation that occurs in schools, not as a result of the law, but as a result of patterns of residential settlements. This was often found in the North Many black Americans were pushed to the poor communities by inequality of opportunities o De jure segregation- Racial segregation that is established and required by law Many southern laws would require business to have two separate facilities for black and white Americans.
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  • Fall '19
  • First Amendment to the United States Constitution, Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

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