1008 1004 1008 1004 pg 1008 1004 Coriolis force applied Coriolis force undone

1008 1004 1008 1004 pg 1008 1004 coriolis force

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1008 1004 1008 1004 pg 1008 1004 Coriolis force applied Coriolis force undone somewhat The net wind direction will then slant across the isobars. For our purpose, it will be good enough to slant the wind (see short arrows below) at about a 45° angle to the isobars. 1008 1004 4a) Now you go ahead and put little arrows on the following diagram (high pressure center or anticyclone) illustrating the overall wind direction on the surface. Put at least ten of these arrows at various locations. You will need to remember how the pressure gradient force, Coriolis force, and force of friction all play a role. H
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4b) Repeat the process for a low pressure center (cyclone). L 4c) Now let’s take a look at the following weather map. Our goal is to put in arrows indicating the wind direction on the surface. Place one arrow at each of the following locations to show which way the wind should be blowing. The tail of the arrow can start at the location noted below. Center of Mississippi Center of Wisconsin West central Colorado Center of Montana Southern tip of Texas
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5) Now we will look at pressure gradient . Pressure gradient is how quickly pressure changes as you move across the surface of the Earth. When the isobars are close together, the pressure gradient is steep. For example, in the above map, if you were to travel from western Illinois to central Indiana, the isobars are close together, meaning that the pressure is changing rapidly as you travel. Steep pressure gradients cause fast winds . Think of a steep hill: a ball would roll down this hill rapidly. On the other hand, if you travel from central Oregon to central Wyoming, you only cross one isobar in that long distance, so pressure is changing slowly. Weak pressure gradients cause slow winds . On the following map, what is the wind speed (slow or fast) at the following locations? Georgia slow Wisconsin fast Northwest corner of map over ocean fast Pacific coast of Washington slow
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  • Spring '17
  • John DOe
  • Meteorology, Force, pg, Geostrophic wind, pressure gradient force, coriolis force, Atmospheric dynamics

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