Life span and gender A patients age can greatly increase the risk of adverse

Life span and gender a patients age can greatly

This preview shows page 26 - 33 out of 33 pages.

Life span and genderA patient’s age can greatly increase the risk of adverse effects from drug therapy.In addition, older adults are more likely to be receiving polypharmacyfor multiple chronic illnesses.
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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & WilkinsAssessment of Core Patient Variables (cont.)Lifestyle, diet, and habitsThe patient’s lifestyle, diet, and other health habits can have an impact on drug interactions.EnvironmentThe patient’s environment may increase the likelihood that a certain adverse effect will occur.For instance, some antibiotics can cause the adverse effect of photosensitivity.The environment in which drug therapy is administered can also play a role in the early detection of adverse effects.
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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & WilkinsAssessment of Core Patient Variables (cont.)Culture and inherited traitsResearchers are beginning to study responses to drug therapy that are genetically determined in various ethnic and racial populations.These responses may place the patient at greater risk than the rest of the global population for adverse effects or drug interactions.
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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & WilkinsNursing Diagnoses and Outcomes Risk for Infection related to drug-induced myelosuppressionDesired outcome:The patient will not develop infection while on drug therapy.Imbalanced nutrition: Less Than Body Requirements related to drug-induced nausea, vomiting, anorexia, stomatitisDesired outcome:Despite adverse effects, the patient will receive enough nourishment to meet physiologic needs.Risk for Poisoning (Toxicity) related to use of drug with a narrow therapeutic indexDesired outcome:The patient will receive drug therapy without harmful or poisonous effects.
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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & WilkinsPlanning and Intervention Maximizing therapeutic effectsWhen drug interactions are intentional and desirable, it is important to give the drugs at the prescribed time intervals.Minimizing adverse effectsTo help protect the patient from serious adverse effects and drug interactions, obtain a drug history from the patient.If a patient is taking a drug that may interact with another drug, the drugs should not be coadministered.Throughout therapy, monitor the patient for signs and symptoms of interactions and adverse effects.
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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & WilkinsProviding Patient and Family Education Inform the patient and family about adverse effects and drug interactions.Initial instruction includes teaching the patient how to minimize the occurrence of these effects.Teach the patient which effects to expect, which to report to the prescriber,and which require immediate medical attention.
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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & WilkinsAssessment and Evaluation During drug therapy, monitor for adverse effects and drug interactions.Consider the possibility of a drug interaction each time a new drug is added to the treatment plan.
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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & WilkinsENDThank you!
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  • Pharmacology, Wolters Kluwer Health, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Lippincott Williams

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