The south believed that the bible said that children

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numerous biblical references that “proved” slavery as moral and therefore legal. The South believed that the bible said that children of the Devil turned black and they took this literally by believing that blacks were the children of the Devil and by birthright, whites overpowered them on the hierarchy totem pole. This racial superiority remains evident way into the twentieth century but on a much lighter scale. Consequently, the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries are noted for the separation of the United States by the institution of slavery. And although, the northern region opposed it, the South relied on it and developed many economic, legal, religious, social and moral reasons why slavery should remain a legal institution and also why it was vital to the economic survival of the South as the
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ultimate free labor source. 2) What is meant by the “First Emancipation,” and when and how was it achieved? Support your answer with specific examples, including: A) how slavery was incongruent with the Declaration of Independence; B) the attitudes of both the Founding Fathers’ regarding slavery; C) and, how the U.S. Constitution dealt with the institution of slavery. The Emancipation Proclamation consists of two executive orders issued by United States President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War. The first one, issued1862, declared the freedom of all slaves in any state of the Confederate States of America that did not return to Union control by January 1863. The second order, Lincoln issued the Executive Order by his authority As ” Commander in chief of the Army and Navy”. Slave holding border states of Kentucky, Missouri, Maryland, or Delaware, which had never declared a secession, and so it did not free any slaves there. The state of Tennessee had already mostly returned to Union control, so it. Virginia was named, but exemptions were specified for the 48 counties that were in the process of forming West Virginia, as well as seven other named counties and two cities. Also specifically New Orleans and thirteen named parishes of Louisiana, all of which were also already mostly under federal control at the time of the proclamation. Although most slaves were not freed immediately, the Proclamation did free thousands of slaves the day it went into effect in parts of nine of the ten states to which it applied (Texas being the exception). In every Confederate state (except Tennessee and Texas), the Proclamation went into immediate effect in Union- occupied areas and at least 20,000 slaves were freed at once on January 1863. Additionally, the Proclamation provided the legal framework for the emancipation of nearly all four million slaves as the Union armies advanced, and committed the Union to ending slavery, which was a controversial decision even in the North. More slaves quickly escaped to Union lines as the Army units moved South.
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  • Spring '10
  • walker
  • The Bible, Slavery in the United States, American Civil War

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