Concern over a decline in the countrys moral values welled up on both sides of

Concern over a decline in the countrys moral values

This preview shows page 28 - 31 out of 236 pages.

the American spirit." Concern over a decline in the country's moral values welled up on both sides of  the political aisle. In 1985, anxiety over the messages of the music industry led to
the founding of the Parents Music Resource Center (PMRC), a bipartisan group  formed by the wives of prominent Washington politicians including Susan Baker,  the wife of Reagan's treasury secretary, James Baker, and Tipper Gore, the wife  of then-senator Al Gore, who later became vice president under Bill Clinton. The  goal of the PMRC was to limit the ability of children to listen to music with sexual  or violent content. Its strategy was to get the recording industry to adopt a  voluntary rating system for music and recordings, similar to the Motion Picture  Association of America's system for movies. The organization also produced a list of particularly offensive recordings known  as the "filthy fifteen." By August 1985, nearly twenty record companies had  agreed to put labels on their recordings indicating "explicit lyrics," but the Senate  began hearings on the issue in September  (Figure 31.8).  While many parents  and a number of witnesses advocated the labels, many in the music industry  rejected them as censorship.  Twisted Sister's  Dee Snider and folk musician John Denver both advised Congress against the restrictions. In the end, the recording  industry suggested a voluntary generic label. Its effect on children's exposure to  raw language is uncertain, but musicians roundly mocked the effort.
941 Listen to the testimony of  Dee Snider  ()  and  John Denver  ()  to learn more about the contours  of this debate. [Image:  Figure 31.8  Tipper Gore, wife of then-senator (and later vice president)  AI Gore, at the 1985 Senate hearings into rating labels proposed by the PMRC,  of which she was a cofounder.] THE AIDS CRISIS In the early 1980s, doctors noticed a disturbing trend: Young gay men in large  cities, especially San Francisco and New York, were being diagnosed with, and  eventually dying from, a rare cancer called Kaposi's sarcoma. Because the  disease was seen almost exclusively in male homosexuals, it was quickly  dubbed "gay cancer." Doctors soon realized it often coincided with other  symptoms, including a rare form of pneumonia, and they renamed it "Gay  Related Immune Deficiency" (GRID), although people other than gay men,  primarily intravenous drug users, were dying from the disease as well. The  connection between gay men and GRID--later renamed human  immunodeficiency virus/autoimmune deficiency syndrome, or  HIV/AIDS --led 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture